Intel Skylake Audio Support For Linux 3.19

Intel’s next-generation Skylake processors are starting to take shape with the Linux 3.19 kernel…

After 10+ Years, NetworkManager Reaches v1.0

After more than ten years of development, Dan Williams of Red Hat has announced the release of NetworkManager 1.0. The NetworkManager 1.0 release is more than just bumping the version after waiting long enough, but there’s many improvements too over NetworkManager 0.9!..

VDPAU Updated To v0.9

Before going on holiday break, Aaron Plattner at NVIDIA released version 0.9 of the VDPAU library (libvdpau) and of the VDPAU information utility (vdpauinfo)…

Building a Healthy Web to Hand to Future Generations

Ten years ago, a scrappy group of ten Mozilla staff and thousands of volunteer Mozillians broke up Microsoft’s monopoly on accessing the Web with the release of Firefox 1.0. We won by bringing together a diverse and global community through … Continue reading

Defending the Free Linux World


The Open Invention Network, or OIN, is waging a global campaign to keep Linux out of harm’s way in patent litigation. Its efforts have resulted in more than 1,000 companies joining forces to become the largest defense patent management organization in history. The Open Invention Network was created in 2005 as a white hat organization to protect Linux from license assaults. It has considerable financial backing from original board members that include Google, IBM, NEC, Novell, Philips, Red Hat and Sony.

Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Gets Linux Kernel Regression Fix

A Linux kernel regression for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) has been identified by Canonical and the developers have issued a patch that should be available through regular channels.

Canonical lands numerous kernel updates during the development cycle of an Ubuntu version and it’s likely that some of those will probably cause problems due to some unforeseen circumstances. That’s quite normal and it’s one of the reasons for the existence of there regression fixes.

“USN-2448-1 fixed vulnerabil… (read more)

Divinity: Original Sin For Linux Will Launch with Improved Engine and Gameplay

Divinity: Original Sin is a complex RPG developed by Larian Studios that managed to get a lot of praise from the community. It’s been out on Windows for quite some time and the developer are also planning a Linux version.

The Linux edition of Divinity: Original Sin has been in the works for some time and the devs said that it will be out for the open source platform sometime in March. Now, more good news is coming from Larian Studios as the developers also said that the Linux version of Divin… (read more)

Gates of Horizon Is a New MMO for Linux without Subscriptions or Micro-Transactions

Gates of Horizon, a new massively multiplayer online game developed and published by Hex Keep, has been released on Steam for Linux.

There are quite a few MMO titles on Steam for Linux already and they are pretty varied, for the most part. Surprisingly enough, there is no game quite lite Gates of Horizon, which does away with fancy graphics and focuses more on the gameplay experience. This title has been described as a space conquest online game, but it does features some interesting RPG elem… (read more)

An Open Hardware Random Number Generator Proposed

In 2015 we might see an open hardware random number generator that would connect to the system via an SD card slot…

Behind the scenes at TDF: Quality Assurance (QA)

Towards the end of the year, The Document Foundation would like to share achievements in 2014 with our community and our generous donours, to whom we’d like to express our sincerest gratitude and thanks for their incredible and wonderful support and their invaluable contributions!

As a start, Robinson Tryon, who is in charge of Quality Assurance (QA) since August, and summarizes the efforts in this important area:robinson-in-brussels

Hi all,

I’m Robinson Tryon and I’m a QA Engineer for The Document Foundation. I became quite interested in computers in high school and got my first taste of Free Software playing around with RedHat Linux on a spare machine.

In college I started to study computer science in earnest, and found myself very interested in the topics of human-computer interaction and computing freedom. I can’t remember who first introduced me to the Free Software Foundation, but I have fond memories from my undergraduate years of attending annual membership meetings at MIT and thinking of how I’d like to get a job where I could spend my time working on Free Software.

In the years since I graduated with a degree in computer science, I’ve been fortunate to be able to work with a number of different organizations and labs on Free Software projects. I’ve worked on a multimedia engine used to create training simulations for doctors and first-responders, tools for teaching non-technical people how to use programs such as git and ssh, and a series of web-based games designed to help libraries, museums, and other organizations crowd-source metadata for images and video in their collections. I was very excited to join the Document Foundation this year and bring my experience to the LibreOffice project.

My first contributions to LibreOffice came early-on in 2010 when the project was just starting out. The renewed energy and community-focus espoused by the leaders heartened me, and the reduced barriers to contribution sounded very promising. I tested out new builds and made a few small edits to the wiki, but didn’t get seriously involved until a couple of years later. Up until that point, I was just a user.

When I was still in college, I remember running Sun’s OpenOffice.org off of a Knoppix LiveCD. I desperately wanted to find an alternative to running MS-Office to type up all of my papers and reports, and just using a text editor wasn’t quite cutting it. Although I wasn’t always able to work on my own desktop computer in my dorm room, carrying around a Knoppix CD made it possible for me to boot-up and run a Free Software office suite on the public cluster machines.

By the time LibreOffice had its first release, I had upgraded from the CD and could carry around Free Software programs on a USB stick, ready to be run on any computer. I currently carry a USB stick with builds of LibreOffice for Windows, GNU/Linux, and Mac. My thinking is that if a friend ever needs a hand opening documents on a computer, it’d be great for me to have the right tool ready to go for them. In fact, using LibreOffice to help out a friend is what got me very involved with LibreOffice and the QA Team.

A friend of mine had a large number of documents in proprietary formats (word processing, spreadsheet, etc..) and reading through the LibreOffice documentation I found out that the suite has some excellent tools for conversion of documents from one format to another, including the ability to bulk-convert via the command line one hundred documents as easily as one document. While I was doing my research, I started to chat with contributors to the LibreOffice project, I attended a couple of QA Meetings, and before I knew it was an active member of the QA Team!

When I first started out contributing to LibreOffice, I focused on some basic bug triage tasks and filled-in missing pages on the TDF wiki. As my understanding of the project and its members grew, I was able to make contributions to Bugzilla, to the BSA, and MediaWiki, and was able to help set up tools such as ownCloud. I currently work on a large number of different QA tasks for LibreOffice, including generating binary-bisection or “bibisect” repositories, improving and updating QA documentation on the TDF wiki, and overseeing the implementation of improvements to Bugzilla. Right now I’m gaining experience as a Release Engineer for LibreOffice.

In addition to the technical tasks I undertake for LibreOffice, I work on LibreOffice outreach — both in the US and abroad. Although we have a large number of active users, only a small fraction of them are active contributors. We are always looking to expand the number of contributors in each of our teams, and are excited about getting more people involved in QA through our BugHunting sessions and LibreFests.

A LibreFest is usually a one or two-day event in which various LibreOffice teams may participate. LibreFests, just like hackfests, are typically held in person, as that’s the best way for us to collaborate with and teach new contributors. When the QA Team participates in a LibreFest, users are asked to perform basic or advanced bug triage, to bibisect regressions, and to file new bugs that they observe. With experienced LibreOffice team members present, users feel much more comfortable stepping outside their comfort zone and taking on QA tasks that they wouldn’t try to tackle by themselves.

In our BugHunting sessions, we spend a weekend (usually Fri-Sun) testing the latest builds of a new Release Branch. One of the tools we use to test the builds is MozTrap — a test case management system that help to ensure greater reliability and consistency. Through extensive use of LibreOffice, we hope to shake-out any obvious bugs and squash them before going further in with the release process.

Speaking of BugHunting sessions, this weekend (Dec 19-21), we’ll be having a BugHunting session for the upcoming 4.4 Release Branch. We’ve worked to make it easy for newcomers to participate. To join in, or just for more information, see: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/BugHunting_Session_4.4.0_RC1

LibreOffice 4.4.0 bug hunting sessionIf you’re looking for a way to participate in LibreOffice, or just curious about what we do in QA, please stop by our mailing list or our IRC channel. There’s so much more that we do that can’t be contained in a single blog post, and we’d love to tell you all about it!

LLVM 3.6 Will Be Branched Next Month

We’re starting to hear details about the LLVM 3.6 release plans…

Opera Browser Puts Out Linux Updates For The Holidays

There are stable, beta, and developer updates out this week for the Linux / OS X / Windows versions of the Opera web-browser…

Ubuntu Systems Used in Slovakian Municipal Elections

Linux systems are becoming more and more popular, not to mention easier to use. The direct result of this is that the public sector has started to take notice. In Slovakia, for example, Ubuntu has been used in the recent elections.

One of the main features of Linux systems is definitely security and that might be the main reason for choosing it, especially in a sensitive domain like the elections. Another major advantage is that Linux is usually open source and that helps city administrations… (read more)

GNOME Shell 3.15.3 Adds Support For High-Contrast Themes

Various GNOME packages are being checked in this week for GNOME 3.15.3, another development release toward GNOME 3.16…

Manjaro 0.8.11 Brings Support for Linux Kernel 3.18

Manjaro 0.8.11 is a Linux distribution based on Arch Linux, which is also 100% compatible with the repositories of the base system. It’s been out for a short time, but developers have already pushed a second major update for it.

It took developers a lot of time to get Manjaro 0.8.11 out the door and it looks like there are still a large number of issues and other problems to be fixed. The good news is that devs are very much aware that they need to fix things, so they are working very hard fo… (read more)

Linux 3.19: ThinkPad Muting Redone, New Dell Backlight Support, Acer Is Banging

The x86 platform driver changes for the Linux 3.19 kernel have been submitted and they include some noteworthy improvements for many Linux laptop owners…

Lubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 Is Out and Still Uses LXDE – Gallery

Lubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 (Vivid Vervet) has been officially released and it follows its Kubuntu and Ubuntu GNOME brethren. Users can now download and test this latest installment.

The Ubuntu ecosystem gathers some of the most important desktop environments under one roof and LXDE is just one of them. Besides Xubuntu, which is a no-show for this Alpha, Lubuntu is actually the lightest version available.

It’s capable of running on systems with very low hardware requirements and it can be consider… (read more)

KVM Drops Support For IA64 While Adding Various x86 Improvements

The KVM changes have been queued up and called for pulling into the Linux 3.19 kernel…

GCC 4.8.4 Officially Released

For those sticking to the GCC 4.8 compiler series rather than the newer GCC 4.9 stable series, the GCC 4.8.4 release is now available…

Ubuntu GNOME 15.04 Alpha 1 Prepares for GNOME 3.14, Go Forth and Test

The Ubuntu GNOME developers have released the first version of the 15.04 branch for their Linux distribution and it looks like this operating system is also going through some interesting changes, just like Ubuntu, although not on the same scale.

Ubuntu GNOME 15.04 Alpha 1 (Vivid Vervet) is the next version in the series and the first Alpha version has arrived with a moderate number of changes, although some important ones are being prepared and they will likely land in next devel iteration.
… (read more)