Development: TARBALLS DUE: 3.15.92

Hi!

Please do your best to keep this Monday deadline, it really helps the
work of the release team.

Thank you all!

Fred

World Wine News Issue 387

WWN Issue 387 was released today.

Wine in Buildroot
Weekly AppDB/Bugzilla Status Changes

Development: GNOME 3.15.92 rc tarballs due (and more)

Hello all,

We would like to inform you about the following:
* GNOME 3.15.92 rc tarballs due
* Hard Code Freeze

Tarballs are due on 2015-03-16 before 23:59 UTC for the GNOME 3.15.92
rc release, which will be delivered on Wednesday. Modules which were…

WordPress 4.2 Beta 1

WordPress 4.2 Beta 1 is now available! This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.2, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can […]

e.V. President Lydia Pintscher on the Role of a Nonprofit in Open Source Development

Linux.com interviews KDE e.V. president Lydia Pintscher. She talks about what KDE’s legal body does and why it is important for open source communities to have a charity to represent them. She also discusses the difference between company and commun…

Voting is Open for the 2015 At-Large Board Elections

Voting is now open for the 2015 At-Large Board positions for the Drupal Association! If you haven’t yet, check out the candidate profiles and review the Meet the Candidate sessions (we ran three) that we held. Get to know your candidates, and then get …

Development: GNOME 3.15.91 released!

Hi,

the second beta release of the GNOME 3.15 development cycle is finally here!

ISO’s of this release are avaialble here [1]. Thanks to Dominique
Leuenberger for this work

With this release we are officially now in “The String Freeze” [1] (that
sta…

KDE accepted to Google Summer of Code 2015

The KDE student programs team is happy to announce that KDE has been accepted as a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2015. This will allow students from around the world to work with mentors on KDE software projects. Successful students…

Wine 1.7.38 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.38 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

New version of the Gecko engine based on Firefox 36.
Support for themed scrollbars.
Updated version of the Mono e…

digiKam Sprint 2014

digiKam is a mature open-source project (more than 14 years old now) that provides a digital asset management application oriented to photography post-production.

The Event

It had been almost three years since the last time the digiKam team had an opportunity to meet, talk, code and spend some time together. Gilles Caulier, the lead coordinator, was a victim of a serious car crash two years ago and was thus unable to organize or attend such an event. Now, we finally had an opportunity to meet again. After a lot of effort finding a suitable place and a date suitable for all developers to work together under optimal conditions, the digiKam coding sprint 2014 finally took place in Berlin, between November 14th and 16th 2014.

Before going through what happened during these days, we give sincere thanks to Digia, the company in charge of Qt development, for hosting the event, and also in particular Tobias Hunger, who welcomed us at Digia’s offices located in the South of Berlin. Many thanks also to KDE e.V. for financial support that made the sprint possible.

People participating in the sprint (below, from left to right) :

What happened during the sprint

The next major task is to port digiKam to Qt5. Approximately 10% was already ported by Gilles before the sprint, and the objectives for this coding sprint were as follows:

  • Specify timeline for porting digiKam.
  • Identify priorities (what should be ported first).
  • Delegate porting tasks to developers (who does what?).

Long discussions evolved around these topics. Gilles explained the experience he already gained with this sort of work, which tools are available to facilitate the porting, and where manual work is required. The libraries which are part of the digikam project were prioritized for the port, and tasks were assigned.

There were also discussions about the KIPI framework and its plugins. After many years of development, some plugins are essentially unmaintained and no longer needed by digiKam as their functionality was superseded or moved, leaving them out of the porting task. We also talked about APIs to provide better integration between KIPI and digiKam for a task-based framework such as digiKam’s batch queue manager. The KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) port seems like the right time to integrate binary incompatible as well as architectural changes where needed.

Shourya Singh Gupta worked on implementing the KIPI tools functionality in the Batch Queue Manager (Tools Settings). To do this, there were discussions regarding what API changes must be done to the stack to facilitate a generic way to plug kipi-plugins into BQM. By the end of Coding Sprint, there were changes made to APIs to allow a generic way to plug kipi-plugins’ settings widgets into the user-interface, tested by converting two plugins (DNG converter and KIO export tool) to take advantage of this feature. Later, the background processing part of DNG converter—responsible for doing the real work—was also ported. This work is currently still in its separate feature branch, waiting to be merged after the frameworks porting branch becomes more stable.

Marcel worked on memory consumption problems with the database functionalities as well as several reported memory leaks. As soon as he could reproduce the problems under valgrind, many cleanups and fixes were committed. Among other fixes a long-standing bug (https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=205776) was fixed.

He also worked to complete the Removable Collection support. The goal is to show thumbnails from disconnected media without actually having access to the full file, as this information is stored by the digiKam in its internal metadata database. In practice this means that users can continue to search and preview collections with thumbnails and other metadata. Feedback to the user is provided to indicate items and collection that are not available for editing (See bugs https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=191494 and https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=114539). This feature was completed during the train ride back from Berlin, and committed Sunday evening following the Sprint.

Gilles polished the whole libkgeomap public API to be ready for the KF5 port. A lot of changes have been applied to reduce binary compatibility issues. This is especially needed if a library is to become a KF5 library to be more easily reused by other projects. A similar move has recently been made to libkface to make it available for KPhotoAlbum.

Veaceslav worked on porting libkdcraw from the old KDE4 Threadweaver API to the new KF5 Threadweaver implementation. Unfortunately, the new API was not quite stable nor documented, and Gilles decided to port it one more time to use a pure Qt thread pool implementation.

Teemu fixed some crashes as well as some small annoyances and introduced his plans to work on cleaning up the codebase, starting with cleaning up the CMakeLists and moving misplaced source files to their proper places. This will be an on-going process.

Dmitry, who is a long time digiKam user and who has written the famous Recipes Book, reported the need to have digiKam be less dependent of the KDE desktop so that it can be more suitable elsewhere. This does not mean losing KDE support, but rather wrapping properly all specific KDE features used by digiKam as optional when it’s possible. Dmitry took lots of photo of the event and shared user experience with developers, which introduced some long and instructive discussions about photographer methodologies and workflow.

After long days of coding, the tired developers went out in search for food in the quarter around the hotel at Rosenthaler Straße. Sushi on Friday and Vietnamese food on Saturday managed to sustain the developers for the following day of coding.

Aftermath

The digiKam release planhas been discussed and published. As many kipi-plugins are still not yet ported to Qt5, digiKam 5.0 must be delayed until the end of the year. Christmas sounds like the right moment to offer code to the user community.

MySQL support is disabled by default for now because it’s not fully functional and still experimental. MySQL support is still fully available, but as an optional feature. The plan is to find a student to work on it with the goal to stabilize code, and to add PostgreSQL support through Qt SQL plugins.

digiKam core (and the libraries it depends on) is now mostly ported to Qt5/KF5. It’s compilable and running, although there is still ongoing effort to port away from KDE4 support libraries that are currently used. The port is not yet ready for prime-time and one can encounter bugs caused by porting, but in the near future there will be beta releases to get reports from end-users about regressions.

However, there is still a lot of work required especially with kipi-plugins, of which only a small part (about 20%) is currently ported. For people who want to try out and help with development, the code is available in the Frameworks branches of corresponding projects. The contribution page has more information.

The build-system (CMake) structure is currently being cleaned up to make the codebase more maintainable for the future as well as making writing unit tests a breeze. At the same time, the dependencies of different parts are being investigated and cleaned up, to allow easier compilation on Windows and OSX.

Final Words

digiKam is planning to participate once again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) this year. There are some new ideas available in the wiki to attract new contributors. We suggest that anyone interested in working on digiKam this summer should start getting familiar with the project already.

Once more, thank you to the folks at Digia (and Tobias) for your hospitality and to KDE e.V. for sponsoring the event!

digiKam in action. More photos from the event are available on Flickr.

conf.kde.in 2015 – divine

Building on the success of conf.kde.in 2014 at Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Community Technology (DA-IICT) in the land of Gujarat, the horizon of the KDE Community is broadening and shifting south. conf.kde.in 2015 takes place on the…

Akademy 2015 Call for Papers and Registration open

Akademy is the KDE Community conference. If you are working on topics relevant to KDE or Qt, this is your chance to present your work and ideas at the Conference from 25th-31st July in A Coruña, Spain. The days for talks are Saturday and Sunday, 25th and 26th July. The rest of the week will be BoFs, unconference sessions and workshops.


Akademy 2014 attendees

What we are looking for

The goal of the conference section of Akademy is to learn and teach new skills and share our passion around what we’re doing in KDE with each other.

For the sharing of ideas, experiences and state of things, we will have short Fast Track sessions in a single-track section of Akademy. Teaching and sharing technical details is done through longer sessions in the multi-track section of Akademy.

If you think you have something important to present, please tell us about it. If you know of someone else who should present, please nominate them. For more details see the proposal guidelines and the Call for Papers.

The submission deadline is 31st March, 23:59:59 CEST.

Registration Open

Anyone can attend Akademy for free. But registration is required in order to attend the event. Please register soon so that we can plan accordingly.

About Akademy 2015, A Coruña, Spain

For most of the year, KDE—one of the largest free and open software communities in the world—works online by email, IRC, forums and mailing lists. Akademy provides all KDE contributors the opportunity to meet in person to foster social bonds, work on concrete technology issues, consider new ideas, and reinforce the innovative, dynamic culture of KDE. Akademy brings together artists, designers, developers, translators, users, writers, sponsors and many other types of KDE contributors to celebrate the achievements of the past year and help determine the direction for the next year. Hands-on sessions offer the opportunity for intense work bringing those plans to reality. The KDE Community welcomes companies building on KDE technology, and those who are looking for opportunities.

For more information, please contact The Akademy Team.

Dot Categories:

Provide feedback on the issue credit attribution user interface

With the help of a few key community members, we have been hard at work creating an interface for users to attribute their work in the issue queues to a customer or employer. (#2288727: [meta] Provide credit to organizations / customers who contribute to Drupal issues)

This is an important step in beginning to collect information about the contributions that organizations make in the Drupal ecosystem. Dries has talked about this need in detail in his blog post A method for giving credit to organizations that contribute code to Open Source. Since the original vision laid out in that post, which focused on commit credits, we have expanded the scope to include any contribution in the issue queues.

There will be three parts to the release of this feature on Drupal.org.

Comment Attribution

First, we needed a way that contributors could attribute their work to an organization—either their employer, their customer or both. (#2340363: Add issue comment attribution) We would like to have feedback through the comment on the issue. Here is an animated example of the comment attribution user interface:

Snazzy user interface for attributing a comment to an organization and/or a customer.

This new field on every issue comment lets the user attribute their work to organizations per comment. Our team is also very excited to introduce a new interface framework for inline editing of entity fields on Drupal.org. There are so many great ways we could use this for easier in place editing of metadata.

Once this comment attribution user interface is deployed, we’ll see how it is used, helping us build the next step.

Interface for Maintainers to Award Issue Credits

The next step will be a method for maintainers to award credit for the intended attribution. (#2369159: Extend crediting UI to include organizations & customers) Allowing maintainers to commit or award the credit for the issue accomplishes two important goals: we incentivise completion and we reduce gaming of the credit system.

By placing credits on issues—rather than commit mentions—we opened up the ability to recognize contributions outside of code. Patch reviews, comments on architectural decisions, wireframes and mockups, and general design feedback are all valuable contributions to the issue queues. Maintainers will now be able to reward those helpful behaviors.

Highlighting Organizations that Contribute

After a couple of months of collecting issue credit data, we will be able to begin using that data to highlight contributing organizations—giving them “trust currency” as Dries put it so well.

Issue credits are not the only contribution we will be tracking. We are already tracking how organizations give back financially through our supporting partner and membership programs. We track organizations that sponsor DrupalCons—and we’d like to start tracking how organizations help build camps.

Next Steps

If feedback goes well, our Drupal.org engineering team is planning to release the comment attribution feature on March 12th.

The user interface for maintainers to award credit should be available for comment in the coming week. Work on that issue has already started at #2369159: Extend crediting UI to include organizations & customers.

Let us know what you think!

Front page news: 

Aaron Winborn Community Spotlight

Drupal users around the world know Aaron Winborn (aaron), a long-time community member who has made countless contributions to the project and to the people who use it. From building the Media module to helping organize NYC Camp, Aaron has had a massive impact on our community and our project.

For years, Aaron has contributed valuable code, acted as an advocate for increasing involvement in the Drupal community, and has inspired countless people with his brilliance, humility, and grace. That’s why we’re proud to feature Aaron in our latest Community Spotlight, to extend our thanks and let everyone touched by Aaron’s contribution know how they can do the same.

“I met Aaron through Drupal in 2006,” said Jacob Redding (jredding) , a good friend of Aaron’s. “I was living and working in New York, and he was at Advomatic at the time, where he was working on a lot of different things. In 2007 I wound up moving to China and doing some open source and Drupal work out there. Then in March of 2008 I was at a meet-up in China, and there were these guys talking in Chinese about Aaron’s code, and they were ecstatic about it.

“Aaron wrote a lot of modules around media, like putting videos on Drupal sites. It’s something that we do a lot now, though in 2008 it was hard to put video on your website… but Aaron made it easy. So, at this meet-up, these guys thousands of miles away took Aaron’s work and extended it to fit all the video formats that work in China.

“So I filmed this video for him with these developers in China,” Redding concluded. “I said to him, ‘your code just made it to the other side of the planet and made a huge impact — here it is in Chinese, in a different language, for a different market.’ I don’t know where the video is now, but it was really fun. It just shows the way the community gets together and reinforces all these different relationships.”

A friend and mentor

“When I first decided to do Drupal professionally, I was working hard to learn more,” said Alex Urevick-Ackelsberg (Alex UA). “A friend of mine has a firm called Advomatic, and Aaron was the first employee there. So, I asked Aaron if he would help me learn about Drupal, and in repayment, I offered to help him manage the issue queues for his module — the Embedded Media Field. Aaron really helped me figure out the development side of Drupal and… you know, I say that I offered to help him, but really, he’s one of the most giving people I’ve ever met, and I’m sure he would have helped me for nothing more than the karma.”

“He’s a very warm and thoughtful person, and is a very unique individual,” said Amanda Luker (mndonx), a coworker of his from Advomatic. “Aaron has a lot of interesting things to say — you might not know it right away, since he can be very quiet at first. But he really is very thoughtful and sweet. Advomatic was my first job in a development shop, and I was really nervous, but Aaron was so great to work with. He did a lot to help me feel comfortable, and to help me not feel dumb. It means a lot, especially from someone like him — he was always working on a different level. “

Jonathan DeLaigle (grndlvl), another co-worker from Advomatic, agreed. “I’ve always found Aaron to be very approachable, someone that you wouldn’t have to worry about phrasing the question in such a way as to not get ‘oh, well, that’s a stupid question.’ Even though sometimes I’d ask a question that I probably should have known the answer to, he’s the sort of person where it’s ok. You can ask those stupid questions and you can expect a response that’s conducive to your learning experience.”

“It just pours out of him, this intelligence”

When it comes to qualities in Aaron that his friends and colleagues admire, his brilliance is always one of the first things mentioned — alongside his generosity, humility, and kindness.

“Every time I had a conversation with Aaron it was fantastic,” said Redding. “He’s one of these guys where you know he’s super smart. It’s hard to describe when you’re talking to someone who’s pretty much a genius and they’re very subtle and subdued, not over the top — but when you talk to them, you realize what they’re saying is intense and complex and intricate… and it just pours out of him, this intelligence.”

“I met him though the Drupal community,” said Arthur Foelsche (arthurf), who worked with Aaron on the Media module. “Aaron is someone I’ve been at multiple DrupalCons with, someone who I’ve done media sprints with, someone I’ve always appreciated. My experience of Aaron was that every time he encountered a road-block, he always tried to figure out ways to solve it himself.

“That’s not to say he’d eschew other people,” Foelsche added, “but he’d work to figure out solutions that were interesting and relevant to him and to others. He didn’t approach things from the perspective of, ‘why am I being stopped,’ but rather, ‘I bet I can create a solution to get around this problem.’ I see Aaron as this person who believes on a fundamental level that he can make change — not just in Drupal, but in everything and in his personal life. It’s a very important part of who he is.”

“Fixing problems in elegant ways”

Aaron made a reputation for himself in the Drupal community as someone who was happiest when quietly working to solve difficult problems and make Drupal better.

“At one DrupalCon, we were talking through some of the handling of the files themselves in the Media module,” said Foelsche. “Aaron was going through this rumination of, ‘how can these be useful’ and we talked until late at night. We started up again in the morning pretty early (all things considered), and he came back with this notebook just full of ideas. He was so excited and engaged, and just wanted to be able to fix problems in ways that were elegant and useful to people. His enthusiasm around it, and all the time he had spent just that night — I saw him in that moment as just being so glad to be able to work with people on the same problem.”

As any DrupalCon attendee can tell you, camps, cons and great parties go hand in hand. And while loud parties may not be Aaron’s scene, he still participates in his own way.

“I guess one anecdote,” said Aaron Welch (crunchywelch), the founder of Advomatic, “was when we went to OSCon on the Yahoo campus in 2006 or 2007. It was a general Open Source convention, but basically it was overrun by Drupal shops and agents — we completely eclipsed all of the other projects. In any case, the Advomatic team rented a house, and we had some big, crazy parties. There was Guitar Hero on giant screens, lots of drinks, people barbecuing in the back yard… Anyway, Aaron was staying with us at the house, and in the middle of all of this crazy partying going on, he was coding away on the Media module in the kitchen, happy as a clam.

“He was totally participating in his own funny Aaron way,” Welch continued. “He was really happy to be hanging out with everybody, but was still just coding away, being his quiet Aaron self. And that’s Aaron — he’s a pretty reserved kind of person, and he’s the nicest, most dedicated, hard working guy you’ll ever meet.”

Whether alone or in a group, Aaron’s problem solving has gained him a tremendous amount of respect from his peers in the Drupal community.

“Aaron has always tried to find solutions to problems — not just getting around road-blocks,” said Foelsche. “I’ve always been impressed by his knowing himself as a person, and wanting to find ways to do things in the world when he didn’t know that he could. That disposition is a marvelous one. In my opinion, Aaron has always struck a really graceful balance between the ability to solve things on his own and the willingness to work in a group to solve things together. I’ve always enjoyed his company and work, and appreciated not only his disposition in the community but also as a human being.”

“Aaron has never been the person who would blindly jump in if there was a problem,” said Luker. “Working together, he’s always very thoughtful, very deliberate in how he approached things. I could tell that, with his background in philosophy and his interest in alternative education, that independence influenced how he approached life in general. It made me feel like I was in the right place when I started at Advomatic. Knowing that he was there, believing what he believed, it made me feel like, ok, this is a good fit for me, too.”

“An advocate and activist”

Aaron’s passions extend further than just writing code, though. A strong advocate for involvement in the Drupal community, Aaron often quietly stepped up to help grow the project and facilitate change — in Drupal, and in the greater world.

“I would say that Aaron taught me a whole lot of humility,” said Redding. “I don’t know if a lot of people know, but he was behind the scenes of so much stuff. In October of 2009, Aaron stepped up to serve as the Drupal Association (VZW) financial point person for a few sprints… he just sort of stepped in and said, ‘I’m going to do this.’ And he did. At the time he was also running culturefix.org, he was working in activism, and he was — and even after his diagnosis has continued to be — a strong advocate and an activist. He was behind the scenes in a lot of sprints, meet-ups, camps, and was instrumental in a lot of the foundational work that turned into the Drupal Association as it is today.”

“Aaron is, to me, really inspirational when it comes to open source. He really lives it and gives himself to it,” agreed Urevick-Ackelsberg. ”He needed the work, like everybody else, but whatever he could give he gave freely. I feel like, for all the people whose lives he has touched, the repayment is that they’re here and contributing— and I think the real lesson that I’ve taken from him is to give yourself as freely as you can afford to, and the payback for the community that you’re a part of, it goes on and on.”

“Aaron has taught me that you should enjoy the people and the things around you,” Urevick-Ackelsberg said. “I know that Aaron has and does; he’s very inspirational in that regard. He’s taught me that you have to do good things every day, and to give yourself as freely as you can.”

“Strength and dignity from day one”

In spring of 2011, Aaron was diagnosed with ALS, which he announced in a heart-wrenching post on his blog several months later.

“When Aaron got his diagnosis, he took the news and he tried to find a solution,” said Redding. “He’s used the time he has to the best of his ability: he’s spent it with his family, with the communities around him, and looked towards the future of what he could do for those around him — including those he will never meet.”

“He has been so realistic and matter of fact about it,” said Aaron Welch. “It’s just incredible watching how strong he has been. A lot of people would, I think, give up — but Aaron has always been focused on the next challenge. We wanted to give him every opportunity to keep working,” Welch continued. “We knew it would be important — you have to have something to keep you going, and he was always just so strong and generous about it. He was grateful for any help he received, but he wasn’t necessarily asking for it, either. I think you can see that strength and dignity from day one on. He’s just been incredible through the whole thing.”

About a year after Aaron’s initial diagnosis, he and his wife attended DrupalCon Denver. Though his condition had begun to deteriorate, Aaron did not let it stop him from making the most of the experience.

“I remember, we had a day when the Advomatic team all worked together in the same room — and we’re never all in the same room so that was great,” said Luker. “At that point he was able to use voice commands to do his work, and we were all joking about how he got way more done not even typing than the rest of us in the room. You could tell he was so happy to be at DrupalCon — with his community, with his people — and he was so happy that he could contribute.”

“Since his diagnosis it’s been hard,” said Sam Tresler (Tresler), another friend of Aaron’s. “The way he can muster the ability to still find joy in the various things that he does…the ability to face something like that with dignity is such an inspiring thing to me.

“You kind of assume when that much of yourself is taken away, it would cause some drastic changes to an individual — but he hasn’t changed. He’s just using different tools,” Sam continued. “And that’s the best thing I could say about him — his priorities haven’t changed, his desire to learn didn’t change, and his determination to keep his quality of life and his family’s quality of life is forefront in his mind.”

As part of preserving that quality of life for his daughters and his family, Aaron wrote a short book for his daughters called “Where Did Daddy Go?” The book tells the story of a young girl trying to discover what happened to her father, who died. She asks, as a four-year-old might, her pets, the sun, moon and earth, before finally asking her sister and mother,”Where did Daddy Go?” Aaron plans to make the book available on Amazon in the coming weeks.

“We wouldn’t be what we are without him”

“Aaron has always been an example of the values we hold dear in the Drupal community. His humility, generosity, and enthusiasm have quietly but profoundly helped shape our community into what it is today. Drupal wouldn’t be the same without him,” said Dries Buytaert (dries), speaking to Aaron’s numerous contributions to both the Drupal project and the wider community.

“If you look at Drupal 8, and how much time and energy people spent on it, and all the conferences we’re having on it, he has a big influence in it,” said Redding. “He’s not making a big deal about it… he’s not out there saying, ‘I did this!’ because he’s never been that way. But his work on the Media module is really important to Drupal 8, and this comes back to his lessons in humility: that you should do what you do because you like doing it, work on what you love to work on, and if it becomes a big deal, great— and if it doesn’t, great. You don’t have to get caught up in it.”

“Aaron was the first employee of Advomatic,” said Aaron Welch. “It’s hard to point out just one thing Aaron did — I couldn’t even tell you how many projects we worked on together. But we could always, always count on Aaron to be there and help out when we put in a lot of long hours. For a pretty small team, we were doing big, important stuff— and he was a critical part of building Advomatic and making it what it is today. We wouldn’t be what we are today without the incredible dedication and talent he has shown over the years, and his quiet support and hard work.

“He really, in a way, is one of the founders of the company,” Welch continued. “He made his mark, not just on Advomatic but on the Drupal community in general and it has been amazing watching the outpouring of support. People are always asking, ‘how can we help, what can we do…’ and, in my opinion, the best we can do is support him and give him encouragement. I know he really deeply appreciates it.”

Thank You, Aaron

Aaron has given an incredible amount to Drupal. He has contributed to the project, the community, the Drupal Association, and the wider world in ways measurable and immeasurable. And, as Aaron and his family have found, the world is giving back.

“So many people in the Drupal community have generously given to Aaron’s Special Needs Trust,” said Gwen Pfeifer, Aaron’s wife. “Our family has really appreciated it.”

Aaron, thank you so much for everything you have done for all of us. The Drupal project and the Drupal community would not be the same without you. Your kindness, generosity, humility, and dedication are an inspiration to us all. Thank you for the gift of your friendship and code. Through your hard work, dedication, and your incredible strength of character have made the world a better, brighter place. Thank you for everything.

Updated on March 24, 2015:

The Drupal Association is saddened to announce that Aaron Winborn passed earlier today. We have attached Aaron’s obituary to this community spotlight. He will be deeply missed.

In part of our ongoing work to honor exemplary community members, we have created the Aaron Winborn Award to honor community members who exhibit the incredible kindness, integrity, and above-and-beyond commitment to the community that Aaron loved.

Kontact Kolab Now

Kolab Systems has recently announced substantial improvements to their support for Kolab Groupware, today’s release of Kolab 3.4, recently released Kolab Enterprise 14 and the upgrade of the hosted Kolab Now solution for Enterprise 14. Since the start of Kolab in 2002 as a Free Software project sponsored by the German Federal Office for Information Security, KDE people have played a significant role in its development. Kolab is enterprise-level software that includes group email, calendaring, contacts, file sharing, and task management. Its features also appeal to many individuals.


A little history

The initial release of Kolab was called Kroupware (notice the “K”, it means something ;^) The Kroupware Client was the result of enhancements to KMail and other KDE PIM (personal information management) software, and later became known as Kontact. About 10 years ago, KDE developers were interviewed about the evolution of the projects and provided details about Kontact, the Personal Information Management Suite from KDE. Currently Kontact is the favored client for Kolab; other popular clients are supported as well. Despite its longevity, KDE PIM continues to evolve.

Email still going strong

Despite the rise of social networks and messaging apps, email continues to be the dominant mode of written electronic communication. Over the next few years, email use will continue to grow in the business world and decrease by less than 4% each year for consumers. The average business worker will have to deal with 140 emails a day by 2018, up from 120 emails a day now. (Thanks to theconversation.com)

Approximately 108 billion business emails are sent each day. Email is critical to communication in organizations.

Security and privacy more important than ever

Kolab was designed with a security centric architecture from the beginning. With the revelations of government spying over the past few years and other dangerous electronic invasions, this aspect of Kolab has grown in importance to many people. It was one of the primary considerations for the Munich city government when Kolab was selected for implementation in February 2014. In addition, the City of Munich has implemented the KDE Desktop as part of LiMux – The IT evolution, migrating the City to free and open source software. Privacy and security are essential requirements to organizations, and highly important to many individuals as well.

Kolab Now

Recent reports of government intrusions—involving organizations such as the U.S. NSA and the U.K. GCHQ—are cause for alarm by some individuals. U.S.-based email providers such as Google and Microsoft have been required to release information to government agencies without notifying the people involved. Encryption and other privacy measures can’t be trusted to such arrangements.

Kolab Now provides enterprise-class Kolab capabilities and support for individuals and smaller groups. The secure email and collaboration services are based in Switzerland. Individual data is “protected by a unique combination of terms of service, laws, operational principles and technology. Kolab Now will never put you under surveillance to sell your data or profile and there will be no advertisements. Enjoy the convenience of the Cloud without compromising freedom and openness.” (from the Kolab Now website)

Kolab Systems and KDE

Kolab Systems provides enterprise level support for Kolab Groupware. The company actively supports development of various aspects of Kontact; some Kolab Systems employees are paid to work on Kontact. Through this symbiosis, Kolab Systems has access to one of the best full-featured desktop clients (Kontact), while scalability and other benefits flow to one of KDE’s premier applications. For example, Christian Mollekopf recently wrote about progress with Akonadi. Kolab Systems is an important player in the KDE ecosystem and is a strong advocate for Free Software. Their work with organizations such as the City of Munich reflects well on KDE’s value in large scale deployments.

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World Wine News Issue 386

WWN Issue 386 was released today.

Weekly AppDB/Bugzilla Status Changes

Development: GNOME 3.15.91 beta tarballs due (and more)

Hello all,

We would like to inform you about the following:
* GNOME 3.15.91 beta tarballs due
* String Freeze

Tarballs are due on 2015-03-02 before 23:59 UTC for the GNOME 3.15.91
beta release, which will be delivered on Wednesday. Modules which wer…

Calligra 2.9 Brings Biggest Krita Release and New Kexi Partnership

We are happy to announce the release of final version 2.9 of the Calligra Suite, Calligra Active and the Calligra Office Engine. This version is the result of thousands of changes which provide new features, polishing of the user experience and bug fixes.

What’s in the Box?

ImagineFX Artist Choice AwardThe 2.9 release is so far the biggest release for Krita, the award-winning free and open source digital painting application. Eleven out of twelve of the features were requested by users and funded by Krita’s first Kickstarter action and the twelfth feature will come in 2.9.1!

  • Support for loading and showing multiple images in one window, and viewing any given image in multiple views and windows.
  • Fully integrated the G’Mic set of image manipulation tools, enabling artists to, for instance, greatly speed-up their workflow.
  • Greatly extended support for painting in HDR mode, making it a truly creative tool.
  • New perspective painting assistants to new color selectors, improved transform tools and non-destructive transformation masks, brush engine improvements, workflow improvements, new filters, support for creating and installing resource packs (brushes, gradients, patterns) and many more.
  • More details on krita.org

Professional artwork by David Revoy made with Krita (http://www.peppercarrot.com)

Professional artwork by David Revoy made with Krita (http://www.peppercarrot.com)

The debut of Calligra Gemini, a novel mix of a traditional desktop app and a touch-friendly tablet app.
It encases Calligra’s word processor and presentation apps. (details)

Text document edited on laptop computerThe same text document in tablet mode

The same text document edited on laptop computer and in tablet mode

Kexi, visual data-oriented apps builder received over 150 improvements that make it extra stable and easy to use.

  • Newer technologies have been employed for the tabular (data grid) views and forms.
  • Report Designer, Query Designer and data import assistants have improved substantially. (details)
  • All that is spiced with a dedicated support for KDE Plasma 5’s look and feel.
New table view in Kexi 2.9

New table view in Kexi 2.9

Unmatched integration: Displaying office documents in Okular, KDE’s universal document viewer. For displaying many types of documents Calligra Office Engine has been used, the same that forms a pillar of document viewers on Nokia N9 and Jolla smartphones, COffice Android app and more. (details)

Calligra document plugin for Okular

Calligra document plugin for Okular
showing a DOC file

Dozens of general improvements in common Calligra features as well as Calligra Sheets, Words are present in the 2.9 series. For details jump to the Beta 1, Beta 2 and Beta 3 change logs.

Milo Solutions

At the organizational level awesome news is that Kexi gained a corporate partner, Milo Solutions! (details)
This internationally active software house is focused on cross-platform software solutions with special emphasis on the Qt framework, the same that forms a pillar of Kexi, Calligra and hundreds of other KDE apps. Milo’s proficiency in web, mobile and design does not hurt too in this partnership.

To ensure smooth ooperation, Kexi maintainer Jarosław Staniek acts as a liaison in the FOSS space for Milo, something he already practiced 12 years ago with other companies when Kexi project emerged. The outcome for the community is noticeable; numerous works of the first fully devoted to Kexi software engineer from Milo, Roman Shtemberko, can be already found in the 2.9 release. (read Roman’s experience) So far it looks like a perfect blend of creativeness, technology and cooperation.

LibreOffice 4.4.1 “Fresh” is available for download

Berlin, February 26, 2015 – The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 4.4.1, the first minor release of LibreOffice 4.4 “fresh” family, with over 100 fixes over LibreOffice 4.4.0. The release represents the combined effort of the over 900 developers attracted by the project since September 2010, with at least three new developers joining the project for […]

Open Source vs. Proprietary Firms on the IoT Battleground

A battle is brewing over control of the Internet of Things marketplace. Consumers see only convenience and extensions to their always-on mobile devices. Product makers see a pathway to streaming data that can be monetized from buyers’ connections. Will history repeat itself, as open source begins to take on the current, yet unsustainable, walled-garden core of the IoT?