Release of KDE Frameworks 5.5.0

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.5.0.
KDE Frameworks are 60 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an …

Wine 1.7.33 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.33 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

Support for copy/paste commands in MSHTML.
Some more font support in DirectWrite.
Better handling for loss of foc…

WordPress 4.1 Release Candidate

The release candidate for WordPress 4.1 is now available. We’ve made a lot of refinements over the last few weeks. RC means we think we’re done, but with millions of users and thousands of plugins and themes, it’s possible we’ve missed something. We hope to ship WordPress 4.1 on Tuesday, December 16, but we need your […]

GCompris Joins the KDE incubator and Launches a Fundraiser

GCompris, the high quality educational software suite comprising numerous activities for children aged 2 to 10 well known by parents and teachers all over the world, joined the KDE incubator.

GCompris was started in 2000 by Bruno Coudoin as a Free Software. Originally written in GTK+ the project decided in early 2014 to make a radical change and rewrite it in Qt Quick. The main motivation is the ability of the Qt platform to address the desktop and the tablet market from a single code base.

In order to get the great level of support from a strong developer community, GCompris joined the KDE incubator.

The rewrite is going on smoothly, 86 educational activities of the 140 have been ported to Qt Quick. A release on Android is planned for December 2014 with the help of the KDE translation teams to make sure it is properly localized. Other platforms will follow.

Currently the graphics are one of the weakest part of GCompris, as they were mostly done by the developers, using free graphics assets and sparse graphic artist contributions.

To address this problem, Timothée Giet, a talented graphics artist proposed himself to work on a complete graphics redesign. He is a long standing Free Software contributor, active member of the Krita team and so part of the KDE community. Making new graphics for more than 100 activities is a big work, so a fundraiser has been set up.

The project is not only about creating new background images but consists in a whole graphical rework. At first a graphics charter will be defined as none exists for now in GCompris. This will drive the project towards a unified style that it lacks today. An emphasis will be done on usability, making sure the children find their way easily in each activity.

If you want to help, please consider making a donation.

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Joomla! 2.5.28 Released

Image credit: Helvecio
The Joomla! Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Joomla 2.5.28. This is a maintenance release for the 2.5 series of Joomla! and is the final scheduled release of the series. Support for Joomla! 2.5 is sch…

Audacious Switches Back To GTK2, Adds New Qt-Based User Interface [Audacious 3.6 Alpha 1]

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Canonical Announces Snappy Ubuntu Core, A Transactionally Updated Flavor For The Cloud

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The Complete Guide to Create CMS Pages for your Online Store

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Turla Trojan Unearthed on Linux

Turla, a Trojan that has infected hundreds of 32- and 64-bit Windows computers at government institutions, embassies, military installations, educational institutions, and research and pharmaceutical companies over the years, has been found on Linux systems, Kaspersky Lab reported. The company has discovered two variants of the malware running on Linux.

Ubuntu Developer Tools Center Renamed To Ubuntu Make, Sees New Release

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Nuvola Player 2.5 Released With Spotify Web Player And Grooveshark Mobile (HTML5) Support

Nuvola Player 2.5 was released yesterday, bringing support for new services such as Spotify Web Player, Grooveshark Mobile (HTML5) and others, as well as improvements for some already existing services.For those not familiar with Nuvola Player, this is a cloud music player which integrates various cloud music services such as Google Play Music, Grooveshark, Amazon […]

Ecommerce SEO Trends for 2015

What will Search Engine Optimization look like in 2015? It’s become something of a tradition for SEO professionals to come up with their predictions at the end of each year: are we looking at a full-scale revolution or a few … Read more

Randa Meetings 2014 – Another Great Success

It’s been quite some time since the Randa Meetings 2014 and even this year’s edition of the KDE Community Summit called Akademy has already happened, but it’s still nice to look back and see what was accomplished at this KDE Tech Summit in the middle of the Swiss Alps.

And before we tell you about the seven groups that participated in the meetings this year (and because of the different participating groups and thus a collection of several meetings under the same roof, the event is called “Randa Meetings” with a plural s ;-), we send a big thank you to all the supporters and people that made this gathering possible. It’s because of you that we could work hard for a whole week and make the software you love even better. In the group picture you see KDE’s diversity, and how this year some KDE contributors could bring their families and partners and thus didn’t need to decide between either family holidays or hacking for KDE.


2014 Group picture, by Martin Klapetek (CC-BY-SA)

The KDE Edu group brings students and mentors together

From the KDE education group, we had people from Rocs, the graph tool, from Kig, KDE’s geometry teaching tool, from Artikulate, the new language acoustic learning tool, from KStars, the KDE astronomy tool and of course from Marble, which doesn’t need any explanation ;-). Two Google Summer of Code students for Marble saw their mentors for the first time in Randa and thus got a stronger bonding with our awesome community. I know of at least one of them who found another playground in KDE: GCompris.

GCompris is a new and still young (at least for the Qt version) member of the KDE family. Bruno Coudoin and his colleagues met in Randa to make great progress on porting the more than 140 activities in GCompris to Qt and KDE technologies. Their main focus is currently to finish a first version for Android and thus Smartphones and Tablets. Bruno even did some live user-testing (of course with kids!) during the lunch time. But beneath the normal hacking on KDE educational software, one other focus was the porting of the programs to KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5). Some of the applications will release a KF5-based version in December as part of the KDE Applications 14.12 release.

Different applications port to KDE Frameworks 5

Other applications that either started a port to KF5 or worked on it were KMyMoney, one of our finance tools. The developers also worked on their Windows port. Gwenview, which has since gained a new maintainer and Jungle, a fresh video player.

Porting to and working on KDE Frameworks was a general focus at this year’s Randa Meetings. We tried to push forward Windows and Mac (unfortunately we weren’t able to bring many KDE Mac people to Randa this year) variants and worked on a more coherent developer story and thus a KDE SDK. The port of Kate and KDevelop to KF5 made great progress and they even achieved making it start on Windows. Besides the porting work, this group also got some GSoC students together with their mentors and thus there was some integration of their work on CLang support and QML/JS.


Picture of the new Randa Konqi: with a white star and an Edelweiss like on the flag of Randa. Thanks a lot to the artist Tyson Tan!

The KDE Multimedia group worked on many different things

Alongside and integrated with all this work and groups some other teams participated at the meetings. They are almost part of the inventory of the Randa Meetings ;-). Amarok and the KDE Multimedia team worked on bug triage (cleaning up more than 200 bugs!), polishing their handbook and Phonon. During this intensive week we saw the release of the GStreamer Phonon backend. KMix, the KDE mixer application got another strong push forwards.

And another multimedia application found its way to Randa: Kdenlive, our great non-linear video editor. The project lacked some direction recently and so a face-to-face meeting of some old and some new contributors was a logical step to take. With Till Theato and Simon Eugster some oldsters of the project could help to document and explain the current code and state to the new maintainer Vincent Pinon. Interestingly enough we learned during the meetings that Vincent’s wife Lucie is using Kdenlive in her professional work and as she was in Randa as well we took the opportunity to make a short interview with her (Thanks Françoise Wybrecht for doing the interview and Myriam Schweingruber for the translation. You can download the French version of the interview.

Lucie Robin lives in Voiron near Grenoble – France and works as a professional video maker with Kdenlive.


Lucie with her daughter and Konqi in the background

What brought you to open source?

Despite being an alien to the open source world, I discovered it through my Linux-using husband.

What pushed you to use free software?

As a video maker, I needed professional video software. Since most software in this field are over pricey, my husband suggested to try Kdenlive back in 2011.

After having used it for three years, what is your overall impression?

I got aware very quickly that Kdenlive is an answer to professional needs. But let’s be honest, its use is full of pitfalls and inconsistencies, which could have discouraged me more than once. But luckily I discovered the philosophy behind free software which kept me going.

New energy for Kdenlive and a new KDE Book

The Kdenlive team spend most of their time discussing and setting the roadmap for the future. At the end of the meetings we decided to bring Kdenlive even closer to KDE and thus start an incubation process for them. And thanks to Françoise, Lucie and Kdenlive you can watch yourself how it looked at the Randa Meetings 2014.

Another group came to Randa to work on a new edition of our KDE Guide. After some problems with internet connectivity (ever heard of this problem at sprints or conferences? ;-) they decided to scratch the planned working process and to quickly develop a new one so they could work offline and integrate the new book directly with KDE source code and extract live snippets from it. They had a great start in Randa but it’s not yet done. So if you’re an expert in one of the KDE Frameworks, please help and submit a paragraph, short text or chapter.

In addition to these bigger groups were some smaller teams and single developers in Randa that worked on their projects. One of them is the Gluon group. As a way of creating and playing games, they worked on a KF5 port, and also had a lot of discussion of their future directions and plans. And QMLWeb, a JavaScript Library is currently a one man project with Anton working hard to improve the code and connect with new people.

An amazing time that should be repeated

Organization-wise we tried something new this year to connect the different groups participating at the Randa Meetings even better. During lunch and dinner one person of each group had to tell the others in a few sentences what they are currently working on. So everybody in Randa was more or less aware of what was discussed in the other groups and when they should connect and talk with them. But we learned something else too. Doing this talks two times a day was not necessary and so we plan to do it only once a day in 2015.

For even more information about the Randa Meetings 2014 and some personal views, see a list of blog posts and picture collections. It was an amazing time and we got great feedback for the organizational work and thus are looking forward to 2015 and more very productive, successful and inspiring meetings and sprints. So please support us!

fundraiser banner

PS: There is another great summary in Portuguese of what happened in Randa this year.

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MantisBT 1.2.18 Released

MantisBT 1.2.18 is an important security update for the stable 1.2.x branch. All installations that are currently running any 1.2.x version are strongly advised to upgrade to this release. Download it from here. This release resolves a total of 43 … Continue reading

Install Cinnamon 2.4 (Stable) In Ubuntu 14.04 Via PPA

Quick update for Ubuntu 14.04 users who want to try the latest Cinnamon 2.4 (stable): the two Cinnamon stable PPAs we covered a while back were updated recently with the latest Cinnamon 2.4 (2.4.5).Unfortunately there’s no Cinnamon 2.4.5 (stable) PPA for Ubuntu 14.10. The alternatives are to either add the Cinnamon Nightly PPA (unstable) or […]

World Wine News Issue 381

WWN Issue 381 was released today.

Weekly AppDB/Bugzilla Status Changes

Follow up on Drupal SA-2014-005, SQL Injection

On October 29, the Drupal Security Team issued a Public Service Announcement (PSA) as a follow-up to Security Advisory SA-CORE-2014-005, which disclosed a serious SQL Injection vulnerability in Drupal 7. Our goals with the PSA were to:

  1. Provide an update on the time window between disclosure and first-known exploits
  2. Provide guidance for users who patched or upgraded outside that window
  3. Reiterate the severity of the vulnerability and the importance of upgrading or patching

(Speaking of which, if you have not remediated yet, please stop reading and do so.)

While we feel those goals were accomplished, the PSA also resulted in a large volume of press coverage – in fact much more coverage than the original disclosure of the vulnerability on October 15th. Not surprisingly, the general tone of the press coverage was quite negative. Unfortunately, some of the coverage was also inaccurate which we’d like to address here as well as provide additional context regarding our security processes.

While we don’t know the total number of Drupal sites affected, the number is not near 12 million as stated in several publications. Unless disabled, individual Drupal sites report their existence back to Drupal.org and this system reports around 1 million total Drupal sites. While this is not an exact measure of live Drupal sites we can infer that the affected number of specifically vulnerable Drupal 7 sites is more likely to be under 1 million.

SA-CORE-2014-005 was certainly a severe issue, if not the most severe issue in Drupal’s history; but it’s important to recognize all software has bugs and security issues that require a remediation process. Finding, fixing and announcing security patches is evidence of a healthy security process and Drupal is one of the few content management systems with a dedicated security team that covers both Drupal core and contributed code.

The above said, there are lessons from both the original disclosure and the follow-up PSA that might result in some changes to the Drupal Security Team policy and process, however we want to reinforce that we are deeply committed to keeping Drupal secure. We encourage you to read this whitepaper that explains our processes, policies and contains a good overview of Drupal security.

If you ever have questions, please use the public discussion area for general topics at https://groups.drupal.org/security or contact us (security@drupal.org). Or better yet, get involved. You can find more information on the Drupal Security Team page.

-Drupal Security Team

Call for Volunteers: Licensing Working Group

There are a growing number of licensing-related issues on Drupal.org that are unresolved. Additionally, volunteers who have been tackling licensing issues believe that the policies are often applied inconsistently. The result is that contributors are o…

QLLauncher: Quake Live Launcher For Linux

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How To Get Flash And H.264 To Work In Opera Browser (Ubuntu 14.04, 14.10 and 15.04)

Opera 26 (stable) was released for Linux today and if you’ve tried it, you might have noticed that, at least on a pretty fresh Ubuntu installation, Flash and H.264 don’t work.So here’s how to get Flash and H.264 (used for instance by the YouTube HTML5 player) to work with Opera on Ubuntu. The instructions below […]