BTS Video 109 – Legacy Mode Beta

Take a Behind the Scenes tour of Legacy Mode’s key features – along with some of the combat tweaks coming with it – before the beta launch on Monday.

Drupal.org Maintenance: June 16th 4PM PDT (June 16th 23:00 UTC)

Drupal.org will be affected by our ISP’s maintenance window starting Monday, June 16th, 16:00 PDT (June 16th, 23:00 UTC) and ending Monday, June 16th, 18:00 PDT (June 17th, 01:00 UTC).

Our ISP will be upgrading the firmware on the customer aggregation routers, and we expect to see a 10‒15 minute disruption in traffic sometime during the maintenance window.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Joomla! 2.5.22 Released

Joomla! 2.5The Joomla Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Joomla 2.5.22.  This is a maintenance release for the 2.5 series of the Joomla! CMS addressing a fatal error introduced into the contact form in the 2.5.21 release yesterday.

The update process is very simple, and complete instructions are available here. Note that there are now easier and better ways of updating than copying the files with FTP.

Download

New Installations: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.22 (Full package) »

Update Package: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.22 (Update package) »

Note: Please read the update instructions before updating.

Instructions

*Please clear your browser’s cache after upgrading

Want to test drive Joomla? Try the online demo. Documentation is available for beginners.

Release Notes

Check the Joomla 2.5.22 Post-Release FAQs to see if there are important items and helpful hints discovered after the release.

Statistics for the 2.5.22 release period

How can you help Joomla! development?

There are a variety of ways in which you can get actively involved with Joomla! It doesn’t matter if you are a coder, an integrator, or merely a user of Joomla!. You can contact the Joomla! Community Development Manager, David Hurley, to get more information, or if you are ready you can jump right into the Joomla! Bug Squad.

The Joomla! Bug Squad is one of the most active teams in the Joomla! development process and is always looking for people (not just developers) that can help with sorting bug reports, coding patches and testing solutions. It’s a great way for increasing your working knowledge of Joomla!, and also a great way to meet new people from all around the world.

If you are interested, please read about us on the Joomla! Documentation Wiki and, if you wish to join, email Mark Dexter or Nick Savov, our Bug Squad co-coordinators.

You can also help Joomla! development by thanking those involved in the many areas of the process. In the past year, for example, over 1,000 bugs have been fixed by the Bug Squad.

Contributors

Thank you to the code contributors and active Bug Squad members that created and tested this release:

Abd Al-Mageed Suckar, Achal Aggarwal, Angel Toribio, Bastian W, Ben Tasker, Benjamin Trenkle, Bernard Saulme, Brian Teeman, Camden Narzt, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Chris Davenport, Christopher Masters, Daniel Sloof, David Jardin, Dennis Hermacki, Edwin Cheront, Elijah Madden, Florian Dal Fitto, George Wilson, Hannes Papenberg, Hans Kuijpers, Håvard Kristoffersen, Izhar Aazmi, Jean-Marie Simonet, Jelle Kok, Jisse Reitsma, Juelis Junior, Jurian Even, Klas Berlič, Kristijan Zivcec, Leo Lammerink, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Nha Bui, Nicholas Dionysopoulos, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Ove Eriksson, Ozan Ozkan, Patrick Alt, Peter Lose, Peter van Westen, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Pruteanu Alexandru, Richard McDaniel, Robert Deutz, Roberto Segura, Roelf Pringle, Roland Dalmulder, Sebastien Heraud, Sergey Gribinichenko, Sergio Manzi, Seyi Awofadeju, Simon Asika, Stefania Gaianigo, Stefano Storti, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Joomla! Bug Squad

Thank you to the Joomla! Bug Squad for their dedicated efforts investigating reports, fixing problems, and applying patches to Joomla. If you find a bug in Joomla!, please report it on the Joomla! CMS Issue Tracker.

Active members of the Joomla! Bug Squad during past 3 months include: Achal Aggarwal, Andrea Zagli, Anibal Sanchez, Beat , Benjamin Trenkle, Brad Markle, Brian Teeman, Chris Davenport, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Dan Walker, David Jardin, Demis Palma, Dennis Hermacki, Dimitris Grammatikos, Elijah Madden, George Wilson, Hans Kuijpers, Hugo Avila, Itamar Elharar, Jean-Marie Simonet, jelle kok, Jurian Even, Lara Petersen, Leo Lammerink, Marc Antoine Thevenet, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Mikhail M, Mohamed Infaz, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Peter Lose, Peter Martin, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Robert Gastaud, Roberto Segura, Roland Dalmulder, Sander Potjer, Sergio Manzi, Stefania Gaianigo, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Tom Hutchison, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Bug Squad Leadership: Mark Dexter and Nick Savov, Co-Coordinators.

Joomla! Security Strike Team

A big thanks to the Joomla! Security Strike Team for their ongoing work to keep Joomla! secure. Members include: Airton Torres, Alan Langford, Beat, Bill Richardson, Claire Mandville, David Hurley, Don Gilbert, Gary Brooks, Jason Kendall, Javier Gomez, Jean-Marie Simonet, Marijke Stuivenberg, Mark Boos, Mark Dexter, Matias Griese, Michael Babker, Nick Savov, Pushapraj Sharma, Roberto Segura, Rouven Weßling, Thomas Hunziker.

Treasure Hunter: Large Gnomeball & Recolourable Kit

Show off your footwork with your Gielinor friends, in your team colours, with the large gnomeball – available this weekend on Treasure Hunter!

Legacy Mode Beta – Coming 16th June

Legacy Mode will be yours to test on our beta servers from Monday 16th June. Try out traditional RuneScape combat, special attacks and more.

Community Chronicle 12/06

There are events, videos, fan art and a haunting RuneScape ballad – all featured in this edition of the Community Chronicle.

Joomla! 3.3.1 Released

Joomla! 3.3 - Do More

The Joomla! Project and the Production Leadership Team are proud to announce the release of Joomla! 3.3.1. This is a maintenance release for the 3.x series of the Joomla! CMS.

If you are currently running a Joomla! release on a server with PHP 5.3.10 or later, we encourage you to update immediately to Joomla! 3.3.1 via either the one-click update or the update downloads available at http://www.joomla.org/download.html.

Note that in order to update directly to 3.3.1 via the core update component, you must be running 3.2.2 or later due to the raised minimum supported PHP version and the update system not supporting checking the server’s PHP version in older releases. Older 3.x releases will be prompted to update to 3.2.4 before being presented the 3.3.1 update.

Joomla! 2.5.21 Released

Joomla! 2.5The Joomla Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Joomla 2.5.21.  This is a maintenance release for the 2.5 series of the Joomla! CMS.

The update process is very simple, and complete instructions are available here. Note that there are now easier and better ways of updating than copying the files with FTP.

Download

New Installations: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.21 (Full package) »

Update Package: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.21 (Update package) »

Note: Please read the update instructions before updating.

Instructions

*Please clear your browser’s cache after upgrading

Want to test drive Joomla? Try the online demo. Documentation is available for beginners.

Release Notes

Check the Joomla 2.5.21 Post-Release FAQs to see if there are important items and helpful hints discovered after the release.

Statistics for the 2.5.21 release period

  • 5 tracker issues fixed

See http://developer.joomla.org/version-2-5-21-release-notes.html for details of the tracker items fixed.

How can you help Joomla! development?

There are a variety of ways in which you can get actively involved with Joomla! It doesn’t matter if you are a coder, an integrator, or merely a user of Joomla!. You can contact the Joomla! Community Development Manager, David Hurley, to get more information, or if you are ready you can jump right into the Joomla! Bug Squad.

The Joomla! Bug Squad is one of the most active teams in the Joomla! development process and is always looking for people (not just developers) that can help with sorting bug reports, coding patches and testing solutions. It’s a great way for increasing your working knowledge of Joomla!, and also a great way to meet new people from all around the world.

If you are interested, please read about us on the Joomla! Documentation Wiki and, if you wish to join, email Mark Dexter or Nick Savov, our Bug Squad co-coordinators.

You can also help Joomla! development by thanking those involved in the many areas of the process. In the past year, for example, over 1,000 bugs have been fixed by the Bug Squad.

Contributors

Thank you to the code contributors and active Bug Squad members that created and tested this release:

Abd Al-Mageed Suckar, Achal Aggarwal, Angel Toribio, Bastian W, Ben Tasker, Benjamin Trenkle, Bernard Saulme, Brian Teeman, Camden Narzt, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Chris Davenport, Christopher Masters, Daniel Sloof, David Jardin, Dennis Hermacki, Edwin Cheront, Elijah Madden, Florian Dal Fitto, George Wilson, Hannes Papenberg, Hans Kuijpers, Håvard Kristoffersen, Izhar Aazmi, Jean-Marie Simonet, Jelle Kok, Jisse Reitsma, Juelis Junior, Jurian Even, Klas Berlič, Kristijan Zivcec, Leo Lammerink, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Nha Bui, Nicholas Dionysopoulos, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Ove Eriksson, Ozan Ozkan, Patrick Alt, Peter Lose, Peter van Westen, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Pruteanu Alexandru, Richard McDaniel, Robert Deutz, Roberto Segura, Roelf Pringle, Roland Dalmulder, Sebastien Heraud, Sergey Gribinichenko, Sergio Manzi, Seyi Awofadeju, Simon Asika, Stefania Gaianigo, Stefano Storti, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Joomla! Bug Squad

Thank you to the Joomla! Bug Squad for their dedicated efforts investigating reports, fixing problems, and applying patches to Joomla. If you find a bug in Joomla!, please report it on the Joomla! CMS Issue Tracker.

Active members of the Joomla! Bug Squad during past 3 months include: Achal Aggarwal, Andrea Zagli, Anibal Sanchez, Beat , Benjamin Trenkle, Brad Markle, Brian Teeman, Chris Davenport, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Dan Walker, David Jardin, Demis Palma, Dennis Hermacki, Dimitris Grammatikos, Elijah Madden, George Wilson, Hans Kuijpers, Hugo Avila, Itamar Elharar, Jean-Marie Simonet, jelle kok, Jurian Even, Lara Petersen, Leo Lammerink, Marc Antoine Thevenet, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Mikhail M, Mohamed Infaz, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Peter Lose, Peter Martin, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Robert Gastaud, Roberto Segura, Roland Dalmulder, Sander Potjer, Sergio Manzi, Stefania Gaianigo, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Tom Hutchison, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Bug Squad Leadership: Mark Dexter and Nick Savov, Co-Coordinators.

Joomla! Security Strike Team

A big thanks to the Joomla! Security Strike Team for their ongoing work to keep Joomla! secure. Members include: Airton Torres, Alan Langford, Beat, Bill Richardson, Claire Mandville, David Hurley, Don Gilbert, Gary Brooks, Jason Kendall, Javier Gomez, Jean-Marie Simonet, Marijke Stuivenberg, Mark Boos, Mark Dexter, Matias Griese, Michael Babker, Nick Savov, Pushapraj Sharma, Roberto Segura, Rouven Weßling, Thomas Hunziker.

Krita Kicks Off 2.9 Development Effort with a Kickstarter Campaign


Krita Fundraiser on Kickstarter

Five years ago, the Krita team decided raise funds to raise Krita to the level of a professional applications . That fundraiser was successful beyond all expectations and enabled us to release Krita 2.4, the first version of Krita ready for professional artists!

Now, it’s time for another fundraiser, much, much more ambitious in scope! Dmitry Kazakov has worked full-time on Krita 2.8, and now we want him to work full-time on Krita 2.9, too. And it’s not just Dmitry: Sven, who has contributed to Krita for over ten years now, has recently finished university and is available as well.

So, we’ve setup a base goal that would cover Dmitry’s work, a stretch goal that would cover Sven’s work and a super-stretch goal that would cover porting Krita to the last remaining OS we don’t cover: OS X.

Since 2009, the Krita project has had three more sponsored projects, and all of them delivered: the Comics with Krita and Muses training DVD’s and Dmitry’s work on Krita 2.8. With Krita 2.4, Krita could be used by professional artists, with Krita 2.8, artists all over the world started taking notice and with 2.9, well — we’ll make Krita irresistible!

Help us spread the word and make this campaign a big success!

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Elf City – Design Document 5

Today, we release the final document in our five part series. Inside you’ll find the juicy details on the Hefin and Meilyr clans.

Stay Connected to the Things you Love with Firefox

Firefox puts you in control of your Web experience and is easy to customize so you can use the Web the way you want. You can make Firefox your own through the beautifully designed and powerful customization menu. You can … Continue reading

Plasma 5 Second Beta Needs Testing

The next generation desktop from KDE is taking shape and the second beta is out now for testing. The developers have settled on a name – Plasma 5, and there is only one month to go until the first release so please test packages from your distro or do…

Ecommerce Success Story – An up close look at WishTrend’s tripling growth

WishTrend is a Seoul based PrestaShop store and an international retailer for Korean beauty products. In a country brimming with cosmetics, only a few major brands ever gain global exposure. Eddie and Ryan, cofounders of this online store, aimed to … Read more

Selling on Marketplaces: how to centralize your ecommerce inventory

In this day and age, selling on e-marketplaces has become relatively indispensable for small to large ecommerce business owners. Building an online presence on European platforms such as eBay, Amazon, Rakuten, Zalando or la Redoute, just to name a few, … Read more

KDE Ships June Updates to Applications, Platform and Plasma Workspaces

Today KDE released updates for its Applications and Development Platform, the second in a series of monthly stabilization updates to the 4.13 series. This release also includes an updated Plasma Workspaces 4.11.10. Both releases contain only bugfixes a…

GNOME Foundation: GNOME Board of Directors Elections 2014 – Preliminary Results

URL for the detailed results is
https://vote.gnome.org/results.php?election_id=22.

Sorry for the confusion,
Fabiana

On 9 June 2014 11:41, Fabiana Simões <fabianaps< at >gnome.org> wrote:
_______________________________________________
foundation-announce mailing list
foundation-announce< at >gnome.org
https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-announce

Got Linux? Add Proprietary Code

Migrating to the Linux platform is not an either/or proposition. Linux is so flexible that it offers users a have-it-your-way menu of software options. One option is the Linux desktop. Individual users in home computing, SOHO and SMB operations can choose from a variety of enterprise-class Linux distributions. The Linux desktop OS offers a no-cost or low-cost alternative to Windows or OS X.

KDE releases 3rd beta of Frameworks 5

Today KDE makes available the third beta of Frameworks 5. This beta release is part of a series of pre-releases leading up to the final version planned for July 2014.
This beta features multiple bug fixes, and the finishing touches required to ease th…

Joomla Community Magazine | June 2014

JCM June 2014

The June issue of the Joomla Community Magazine is here! Our stories this month:

Editors Introduction

Why do YOU support Joomla!?, by Dianne Henning

Feature Stories

European Community Leadership Summit – Berlin, Germany, by Ruth Cheesley

Project News

Leadership Highlights June 2014, by Marijke Stuivenberg

Events

Roundup from JUG Corner – May 2014, by Ruth Cheesley

Google Summer of Code

No Silver Bullet – Fail Proof Systems, by Achal Aggarwal
GSOC14 MVC Project, by George Wilson
Joomla! Semantics (Microdata, RDFa), by Alexandru Pruteanu

Developers

Using Joomla to Make Joomla! Starting with JDatabase, by Pedro F. Vidal Lopez

Sitebuilders

Using SobiPro as a CCK, by Dennis Kmetz
Building Joomla! Web Help Systems – Part 3, by Matt Majeske

International Stories

Français

Citius Altius Fortius
Créer facilement son site avec Joomla! (partie 1)
Introduction au développement de plugin
Les améliorations de JLayout pour Joomla! 3.2
Astuces SEO pour migration – Partie 2

Spanish

Ventajas de conseguir extensiones de Joomla piratas
Canales, divisiones, y la muerte de la “Página Web”
Monitorización de sitios web, copias de seguridad…
Hola ¿Qué hay de nuevo?

In our next issue

We want to publish your Joomla! story in the next JCM issue! So take a look at our Author Resources content to get a better idea of what we are looking for, and then register to become a JCM author and submit your Joomla! story!

Kate and KDevelop sprint in January 2014

From January 18th to 25th, Kate, KDevelop and Skanlite developers met in Barcelona. The sprint was focused on the work of the upcoming few months, and covered a wide range of aspects of these projects.


left to right, back row: Kevin Funk, Gregor Mi, Dominik Haumann, Christoph Cullmann, Milian Wolff, Joseph Wenninger
front row: Sven Brauch, Aleix Pol, Heinz Wiesinger, Miquel Sabaté

One of the big initiatives that the developers have been working on recently is the KDE Frameworks 5 migration. During the sprint, Kate’s port to Frameworks 5 matured while KDevelop received its first push towards the adoption of the new Frameworks. This is an important step because it lets the team think ahead about adopting the technologies that will be developed on for the next years.

KDevelop

KDevelop also improved on the supported languages front. The new KDevelop Clang plugin got a big push, and, while it is not going to be released yet, it is expected to supersede the current C++ plugin in the long term. Clang is expected to improve the support for standard C++, and also offers an opportunity to support C projects properly. Eventually, an Objective-C plugin could be built on top of Clang. Clang integration reduces the maintenance burden compared to the self-written C++ parser. During the sprint, we carved out a roadmap for the Clang plugin and also extended what we already have so far. The main focus was on polishing infrastructure inside KDevelop for providing a solid base for integrating Clang’s useful diagnostics and fixits module.


Clang diagnostic

Currently, the kdev-clang plugin consists of only about 4000 lines of code, compared to nearly 55000 in the old plugin. Further good news—there will be a Google Summer of Code 2014 project that will take care of delivering a first releasable version. There’s still *a lot to do* to make this as usable as the previous C++ support plugin. Read more about kdev-clang.

KDevelop’s code assistant popup has gotten a revamp, which will — after some polishing — provide a more flexible and better integrated UI for the assistant features. The useful “blame” feature, which shows who touched each line in the current file as provided by the project’s VCS, was improved as well. It now shows the commiter’s name instead of the commit identifier and also works properly with dark color schemes. KDevelop’s interface is now more customizable, toolviews can be detached (for example, source code documentation can be detached from the main window and moved to another screen). KDevelop’s codebase was cleaned up and quite a few optimizations were added. This and other improvements will give a noticeable performance boost when operating on large projects consisting of thousands of files.


Find out quickly who the writer is

Python

Much internal cleanup was done in Python support and some long-standing bugs were fixed, such as the debugger not working properly. Python 3 support is now finished, and future development will focus on that.

Ruby

The KDevelop Ruby plugin was also greatly improved during the sprint. Lots of bugs have been fixed and a first stable release is closer now.

PHP

The sprint also provided a good opportunity to improve the language support within the PHP plugin. A lot of progress was made on completing syntax support for the new features introduced by PHP 5.4. Most notably there is now full support for PHP’s trait syntax. While catching up with newer syntax features is important, so too is improving support for older features. One of the most requested improvements for the plugin is proper support for PHP’s namespace syntax. During the sprint we worked on making this a lot more usable. However, there are still some kinks to be worked out.

Kate

For Kate, the focus was mostly on the Frameworks 5 port. The port already started back in December 2013, resulting in the KF5-ready KTextEditor framework and stable KF5/Qt5 versions of the Kate and KWrite applications. During the sprint, the Kate team worked on a lot of details, polishing the KTextEditor framework.

KTextEditor Interface Cleanup

The KTextEditor interfaces are responsible for all the interaction between the editor component Kate Part and the host application (eg. KDevelop, Kile, Kate, …). So it is important that these interfaces allow good integration of the editor into the host applications. During the sprint, these interfaces were cleaned up and optimized for speed. In addition, the default colors were extended to allow for better color schemas in the future.

New Status Bar

Previously, Kate Part did not provide a status bar. All host applications (KDevelop, Kile, …) had to write their own variant of a status bar, displaying the cursor position and similar information. In the KTextEditor framework, Kate Part will ship a default status bar, showing the cursor position, the edit mode, the modification state, the highlighting, encoding and the indentation settings. Further information can be found in this blogpost.

KTextEditor Plugin Architecture

KTextEditor’s plugin architecture was improved substantially. Plugins written for the KTextEditor framework will be available in all applications embedding Kate Part, making it possible to share a lot of features such as collaborative editing, search & replace in multiple files, and similar tools. This is possible because the plugin interfaces are now much more powerful than the former interface for shared plugins.

As a byproduct, the Kate application interfaces were completely dropped in favor of the KTextEditor plugin architecture. Most of the Kate plugins are already turned into KTextEditor plugins, such as the Documents sidebar, the Filesystem Browser, Search & Replace, the Build Plugin, the Backtrace Browser.

Kate Application Changes

The Kate application saw several changes; among the most visible is the new built-in tab bar. Previously, Kate provided the Documents sidebar to navigate through files. The Documents sidebar has the advantage that it stays usable when working on a large number of files. However, a lot of users want an integrated tab bar for quick file navigation. Therefore, the Frameworks 5 version of Kate will have both—the Documents sidebar as well as the tab bar. Since the number of visible tabs is often limited, only the tabs that were most recently used will be displayed. Users will be able to navigate quickly through the files being worked on. Besides quick navigation, the tab bar also allows the view to be split the view vertically or horizontally, to show the quick-open view, and to maximize the currently active view by hiding all other view spaces. A preliminary version of this tab bar as well as a KF5 version of Kate is described further in this blogpost.

vi mode

Kate’s vi input mode also gained several improvements and polishing.

Wrap-up

All in all, a lot of work was done under the hood in both Kate (detailed sprint wrap up report) and KDevelop. The Kate developers are still improving and extending the KDE 4 version of Kate, KWrite and Kate Part, while the KF 5 port is being finalized. The KDevelop team started porting to KF 5 as well, but continues to improve the KDE 4 version in the meantime. A major effort is being made to rework KDevelop’s C++ language support to be more reliable, powerful and easy to maintain in the future.

Thank you

Thanks to Blue Systems for hosting the Kate+KDevelop sprint in Barcelona! Your support is greatly appreciated!

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