Plasma 5.2 Bugfix Update

Tuesday, 24 February 2015.
Today KDE releases a bugfix update to Plasma 5, versioned 5.2.1. Plasma 5.2 was released in January with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.
This release adds a month’s worth of ne…

GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board Meeting of February, 13th, 2015

= Minutes for Friday, February 13th, 2015, 17:00 UTC =
Next meeting due on February 27th, 2015 at 17:00 UTC

== Attending ==
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Rosanna Yuen
* Marina Zhurakhinskaya
* Jeff Fortin
* Sriram Ramkrishna
* Karen Sandler
* Tobias…

Joomla! 3.4 is Here

Image Credit: Chiara
The Joomla! Project and the Production Leadership Team are proud to announce the release of Joomla! 3.4.0 latest releases of the 3.x release series.
What’s in 3.4?
The 3.4 release introduces new features into the CMS such as impro…

Development: GNOME 3.15.90

Hi all,

a few days late, but here it is: GNOME 3.15.90 is now available.

This is the first beta release of the 3.15 development, and it is a big release.
All of the big features that we have been working on have made it into this
release, in more or …

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 4.3.6

Berlin, February 18, 2015 – The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 4.3.6 “Still”, the sixth minor release of the LibreOffice 4.3 family, which is now the suggested version of the software for large deployments in the enterprise and conservative users. LibreOffice 4.3.6 contains over 110 bug fixes. The Document Foundation suggests to deploy LibreOffice 4.3.6 in enterprises […]

Wine 1.7.37 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.37 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

Interface change notifications.
Support for the UTF-7 encoding.
A number of graphical fixes for themed controls.

Moving Forward with Firefox

Next month, Johnathan Nightingale will step down as a full time Mozillian after 8 years of distinguished service. We’d like to thank him for his countless contributions to the Mozilla project and leading Firefox through periods of intense competition and … Continue reading

WordPress 4.1.1 Maintenance Release

WordPress 4.1.1 is now available. This maintenance release fixes 21 bugs in version 4.1. Some of you may have been waiting to update to the latest version until now, but there just wasn’t much to address. WordPress 4.1 was a smooth-sailing release and has seen more than 14 million downloads in the last two months. For a full […]

Joomla! 3.4 Release Candidate Released

The Joomla! Project is pleased to announce the availability of the Joomla! 3.4 Release Candidate. Community members are asked to download and install the package in order to provide quality assurance for the forthcoming 3.4 release.
Joomla! 3 is the la…

GNOME: GUADEC 2015 to happen from August 7 – 9 in Gothenburg, Sweden

Gothenburg By Night

We’re happy to announce that the 2015 edition of GUADEC will be held in Gothenburg, Sweden from
August 7 – 9, at Folkets Hus conference center.

Gothenburg is the second largest city in Sweden, located on the Swedish west coast. The city has a rich history in naval and automotive industries, and these days is home to a thriving IT sector and a strong free software community.

We’re looking forward to welcome the GNOME community to Gothenburg. GNOME has been part of our local Free Software conference, FSCONS, so it’s exciting to bring GUADEC here this year.
– Oliver Propst, local organizer

Join us!
Do you have an idea or project you’d like to share with the community during this year’s GUADEC? Stay tuned. We’ll announce a call for participation soon.

If your company or organization would like to sponsor GUADEC, you can find information on sponsorship opportunities in our Sponsors page at GUADEC.org.

If you would like to join our team and help organize GUADEC, get in touch. We would love to have you on board!

Photo: “Gothenburg by Night” by Rob Sinclair, CC-BY-SA 2.0

GNOME Foundation: GNOME.Asia summit 2015 is call for paper

GNOME.Asia summit 2015 is call for paper
<http://sakananote2english.blogspot.com/2015/02/gnomeasia-summit-2015-is-call-for-paper.html>

<http://www.blogger.com/post-edit.g?blogID=959931218269978020&postID=2100699742572729516&from=pencil>
<http://2015.gnome.asia/static/img/logo_2015.png>

http://2015.gnome.asia/cfp

PRESENTING AT THE GNOME.ASIA SUMMIT
*Click here to submit your presentation!
<http://2015.gnome.asia/cfp/submission/>*
GNOME.Asia Summit 2015 invites proposals for presentations at the
conference. GNOME.Asia Summit is Asia's GNOME user and developer
conference, spreading the knowledge of GNOME across Asia. The conference
will be held in Universitas Indonesia, Depok West Java, Indonesia on May
8-9, 2015. The conference follows the release of GNOME 3.14, helping to
bring new desktop paradigms that facilitate user interaction in the
computing world.  It will be a great place to celebrate and explore the
many new features and enhancements to the GNOME 3.14 release and to help
make GNOME as successful as possible. We welcome proposals by newcomers and
experienced speakers alike.
Possible topics* include*, but* not limited* to:
How to Promote/Contribute to GNOME in Asia

   - GNOME Marketing
   - Promotion of Free / Open Source Software
   - How to run a Local GNOME Users Group
   - Asia success stories / Local GNOME Projects
   - GNOME and Educations
   - GNOME Outreach Program for Women
   - Google Summer of Code

Hacking GNOME

   - Latest developments in GNOME
   - GNOME 3 & GNOME 3 Usability
   - GNOME Human Interface Engineering (Icons and Graphic Design)
   - QA and testing in GNOME
   - GNOME Accessibility
   - GNOME Coding How-to
   - Writing applications for GNOME 3
   - Integration of web life into the desktop

Adapting GNOME to new types of devices

   - Developing GNOME on mobile devices (smart phones, tablets)
   - Developing GNOME on embedded systems or open source hardware
   - On-going projects and success stories
   - Finding Free and Open Source friendly hardware manufacturers

Localization and Internationalization

   - Translations
   - Input methods
   - Fonts

Other topics could include any topic related to Free and Open Source
Software not listed above:

   - Small Board,
   - Open Hardware,
   - Open Data,
   - Big Data,
   - Cloud Computing,
   - Mobile Technology

Lightning talks! A five minute presentation to demonstrate your work or
promote an interesting topic. These talks will be grouped together in a
single session.
A standard session at GNOME.Asia 2015 will be scheduled as 45 mins (35 mins
talk + 10 mins Q&A).  Please take into consideration any time you will need
for preparation. The session could be a technical talk, panel discussion,
or BOF.
If you’d like to share your knowledge and experience at GNOME.Asia 2015,
please fill in the form at before *March 15th, 2015*.  Please provide a
short abstract about your proposal (under 150 words). Include your name,
biographical information, a photo suitable for the web, a title, and a
description of your presentation . The reviewing team will evaluate the
entries based on the submitted abstracts and available time in the
schedule. You will be contacted before *March 17th, 2015* on whether your
submission has been accepted or not.
All interested contributors are highly encouraged to send in their talks.
Please help us to spread the invitation to other potential participants.
Even you do not plan to be a speaker, please consider joining GNOME.Asia
2015. This is going to be a great event!
*Click here to submit your presentation!
<http://2015.gnome.asia/cfp/submission/>*
_______________________________________________
foundation-announce mailing list
foundation-announce< at >gnome.org
https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-announce

We love the projects around us!

Today the Free Software Foundation Europe reminds us to thank and celebrate all those in Free Software we love and whose work we enjoy and built upon. In KDE, we stand on the shoulders of giants. Everything we do in some way depends on Free Software w…

GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the ED search meeting of February, 11th, 2015

= ED Search meeting minutes for Friday, February 11th, 2015, 17:00 UTC =

== Attending ==
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Rosanna Yuen
* Marina Zhurakhinskaya
* Jeff Fortin
* Andrea Veri
* Sriram Ramkrishna

== Regrets ==
* Karen Sandler
* Tobias Muel…

World Wine News Issue 385

WWN Issue 385 was released today.

Weekly AppDB/Bugzilla Status Changes

Development: GNOME 3.15.90 beta tarballs due (and more)

Hello all,

We would like to inform you about the following:
* GNOME 3.15.90 beta tarballs due
* API/ABI, UI and Feature Addition Freeze; String Change Announcement Period
* New APIs must be fully documented
* Writing of release notes begins

Tarballs…

Content Strategy Update: What are we up to?

Back in December, as part of our ongoing efforts to improve Drupal.org, we kicked off a content strategy project with Forum One. Drupal Association engineering and marketing/communication staff partnered with the Drupal.org Content Working Group and met for a two-day workshop to help get the project team from Forum One (content strategists and user experience designers) up to speed on Drupal.org and the ecosystem of sites and services that our community uses to build and use Drupal.

Over the past month, we have pulled together many detailed documents to help guide our work. While we are only about halfway through this project, we wanted to share a bit of the work-in-progress that will influence Drupal.org’s content strategy in the coming months.

What is Content Strategy

Content strategy is the practice and process of planning content creation, delivery, and governance. Its purpose is to create a repeatable system that defines the entire editorial content development process for a website.

Drupal.org is a very unique website. It serves many purposes:

  • Drupal.org is the home of our community. That makes different things to different people, but at its heart, Drupal.org is about the collaboration that allows us to build Drupal the software.
  • Drupal.org is the canonical source for Drupal the software. Drupal.org binds together the respositories for Drupal core and contributed projects, issue queues for requesting features and reporting bugs, and packaging for automated building of releases that are tied to an integrated update process.
  • Drupal.org is the hub of our commercial ecosystem. Companies that sell Drupal services and/or Drupal hosting are brought together with customers of Drupal the software—organizations using Drupal to power their websites.
  • Drupal.org is a communication channel and it feeds other communication channels. We link to a lot of content on Drupal.org and the homepage gets lots of unique traffic.
  • Drupal.org is a source of information. The site provides information about Drupal the software, Drupal.org the site, and the Drupal Association.
  • Drupal.org is a place where people go to evaluate Drupal. Developers, Designers, CTOs, CIOs, and more go to Drupal.org to read about features and success stories to make a decision to use the Drupal the platform to build their content management solutions.
  • Drupal.org is a starting point for support. Many users ask their first questions to the community using the Drupal forums or issue queues. The find answers by searching the Internet and being pointed back to the answer on Drupal.org.
  • Drupal.org is a collection of documentation. Our canonical API documentation is generated from the repositories associated with Drupal.org. Our community has built pages upon page of documentation to help users understand how to build with Drupal and how to contribute to building Drupal.

With so many purposes and competing objectives, a cohesive content strategy that takes in input from many contributors and users of Drupal.org is critcal.

Setting a Content Strategy Vision

To keep us aligned, we outlined three major areas to keep measuring our work against: the big ideas, key messages, and our objectives for content on the site.

Key Messages

  • Drupal.org is the home of Drupal and the Drupal community. It is the source of code, information and collaboration, which enables people all over the world to build flexible and scalable technology solutions together.
  • We are a global community of web practitioners—from project managers and writers, to designers and developers—contributing our unique skillsets to building and growing the adoption of the free and open source software that is Drupal.
  • Drupal is used by nonprofits, government, and Fortune 500 companies to architect customized, appropriate solutions for a wide array of organizational needs.

Content Strategy Objectives

  • Improve quality and findability of relevant content so that users can efficiently move through proficiency levels.
  • Reframe Drupal.org around all user roles and proficiencies so that all audiences are addressed.
  • Develop content governance for Drupal.org to improve the overall quality of content.
  • Improve user engagement within the Drupal.org community so that members form deeper relationships and become Drupal promoters and contributors.

Identifying Content Types and Gaps in our Content

1.2 million nodes, 2.4 million commentsWe have 17 active content types and over 1.2 million pieces of content on Drupal.org. (Really, this is just nodes, we have even more taxonomy terms and views that also represent displays of data.) That’s a lot of content. It’s more than 29,000 projects (modules, themes, distributions, etc.) and over 789,000 issues posted to those projects. We also have over 330,000 forum topics being discussed.

The Curious Case of the Book

With all of that content, 17 types does not quite give us the flexibility or degree of classification that we need to provide truly structured content. We have some content types that are used for so many different kinds of content that they’re virtually meaningless. We have over 12,000 nodes in our “book page” content type. Our book pages can be anything from documentation to landing pages to resource guides to topical pages to module comparisons… really we use them for just about everything.

During the content strategy project, we will explore ways to break our book pages into more meaningful content types that help new users find what they need.

What’s in a Forum

92,029 users have created a forum postAnother content type that gets used for more than it should is the forum topic. We use forums to post news, security announcements, discussions and even support requests. Yet at the same time, it is clear that forums are used far less now than several years ago. We had over 50,000 forum posts in 2008. We had only 11,000 in 2014.

For support and questions, our forums do not have comparable functionality to systems like Drupal Answers—powered by Stack Exchange. Many community members that provide support have already moved to that site to answer questions. Drupal.org is still a starting point for many newcomers to Drupal. One goal of the content strategy project is to make some decisions about where we can best direct newcomers for support.

Where are the Marketing Materials to Help People Choose Drupal?

A key classification of content that we are missing in our information architecture on Drupal.org is marketing materials. We create tons of documentation and handbooks, but we do not have a ton of great materials that tell business evaluators (CIOs, CTOs, managers, and decision makers) why they should choose Drupal. We have a good start with content created to promote Drupal 8, but there is a lot more we can do to help sell the qualities of Drupal.

These are just a couple of the gaps that we have found and are working with the Drupal.org Content Working Group and the Documentation Working Group to address.

Auditing What We Have and Mapping What We Want

We took the time to map our community’s content production over time and the totals were amazing.

The height of our community’s content creation was in 2012, when we created more than 195,000 nodes on Drupal.org and Drupal Groups. As Drupal 7 has matured, we have slowed down a bit. In 2014, we created 116,514 nodes on those two sites. That is still a huge amount of content.

55% of Drupal.org book pages were created before Drupal 7. 32% have been updated since its launch in 2011.Nearly 39% of all of the content on Drupal.org and Drupal Groups was created before 2010. More specifically, 55% of all book pages were created prior to the launch of Drupal 7 in 2011—that’s 5,665 book pages. Only 32% of those book pages have been updated since. That gap of 23% of all book content is a good place to begin an audit.

We are working now to finalize a process for identifying what content could be archived or removed and what content needs to be updated. The community has done admirable job of classifying our documentation by page status, but there is more work to be done. We need an automated process for regularly auditing our content.

We need a better map of related content—content we have and content we need—that can be used to build a better information architecture for new users.

One of the key deliverables for our content strategy project is a site map of what we want the site to look like in 3 months, 6 months and 1 year.

Creating a Governance Plan to Better Support our Community of Creators

We are hard at work reviewing and documenting community processes for maintaining content on Drupal.org. If users have been around for a while, they might have found their way into the content issue queue and wondered at the process and how to start helping. 6,452 users have edited 12,326 book pages over 92,000 times.They may also have jumped in and helped edit a documentation page in one of our numerous books. (6,452 of community members have edited 12,326 book pages over 92,000 times.)

The problem is that these processes are not well known and not built into our tools at a level that helps users know what they should and should not do in the system. Learning the “right way” to contribute requires finding policy documentation that is often difficult to get to, and sometimes out of date. Therefore, along with our new content types, we are assessing and testing the user experience for creating, curating and maintaining all of the content on Drupal.org.

As we document the existing rules that govern how contributions are made, it’s become clear that one of the greatest barriers to contribution, especially for new users, is the sheer difficulty of learning the “right way” to make a contribution. We want to change the way these users interact with the site, so that the correct process and procedure for each type of contribution is baked right into the workflow.

Making our Communications Count

blogs, @drupal, Drupal.org, webcasts, Planet, Groups, newsletters, issuesThe last key deliverable that is being finalized as part of our content strategy is our communications plan. We have 50+ channels that are used by Drupal Association, working groups, social media volunteers, and maintainers to communicate with the community—everything from Twitter to newsletters to the Drupal.org homepage. We do not want to flood you with too much information, but we would like to be able to give you the information you want to see when you want to see it.

Right now, Drupal Association staff and the Drupal.org Content Working Group are mapping our messages to our audiences, our message to our channels and our channels to our audiences. It will be easier than ever to subscribe to the information you want—both email and on the site itself—in the coming year.

Next Steps

We will be wrapping up our content strategy work as March comes to a close.

We will publish more findings along the way. Stay tuned for new content types on Drupal.org—including news, posts, topic-based taxonomy term pages, and better ways to access and help write documentation.

Joomla! 3.4 Beta 3 Released

Joomla! 3.4 is almost ready!

We have revised the launch timeline slightly to ensure we can get everything up to the quality levels we all would like, and to ensure thorough testing on as many environments as possible.

The schedule is now as follows:

  • 10 February – Beta 3
  • 17 February – Release Candidate (RC)
  • 24 February – 3.4 Release

The Joomla! Project is pleased to announce the availability of Joomla! 3.4 Beta 3. Community members are asked to download and install the package in order to provide quality assurance for the forthcoming 3.4 release.

Joomla! 3 is the latest major release of the Joomla! CMS, with 3.4 the fifth standard-term support release in this series. Please note that going from 3.3 to 3.4 is a one-click upgrade and is NOT a migration. The same is true is for any subsequent versions in the 3 series of the CMS. That being said, please do not upgrade any of your production sites to the beta version as beta is ONLY intended for testing and there is no upgrade path from Beta.

Wine 1.7.36 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.36 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

Some preliminary 64-bit support for Mac OS X.
Support for configuring speakers in Winecfg.
Improved support for M…

GNOME: Outreach Program to Join Conservancy from GNOME; Program Renames to Outreachy

Software Freedom Conservancy and the GNOME Foundation together announce that the Free and Open Source Software Outreach Program is moving from GNOME to Conservancy. As Karen Sandler, Executive Director of Conservancy and co-organizer of the Outreach Program, announced in her keynote at FOSDEM this weekend, the program will be rebranding as part of the transition under the new name “Outreachy”.

Outreachy helps people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software get involved by providing a supportive community for newcomers to contribute to throughout the year, and by offering focused internship opportunities twice a year with many free software organizations. To date, the program has had 214 interns with 35 different free software organizations, including the Linux Kernel, Wikimedia, GNOME, Mozilla, Twisted (a Conservancy member project), and OpenStack. Marina Zhurakhinskaya, Community Engagement Lead at Red Hat and co-organizer of the program said, “It’s amazing that the program we started four years ago with eight GNOME interns has grown to enable hundreds of women become established free software contributors across a broad spectrum of projects. I vividly remember the call in which Karen proposed the idea of inviting other organizations to participate, and I’m excited to continue working closely with her in growing the reach of the program.”

The GNOME Foundation, previous nonprofit home of the program, remains a core partner of Outreachy, providing infrastructure support. “The GNOME board is unified in its enthusiasm for Outreach to join Conservancy,” said Jean-François Fortin Tam, President of the GNOME Foundation. “We’re proud to have launched the program and seen it grow beyond our wildest expectations. We look forward to remaining a partner, supporting and participating in the program in its new home as it continues to grow.”

Over the next few months, Outreachy will complete its transition to Conservancy, the non-profit home of over 30 free and open source software projects. “Outreachy is a natural fit for Conservancy,” said Sandler. “Conservancy is organized to support many free software projects — and to promote software freedom in general. This program has become an essential way for free software projects to improve their communities. I am honored to keep working with Marina, Sarah Sharp and all of the other volunteers who keep Outreachy going.”

The next round of Outreachy internships will have an application deadline on March 24, 2015, and internship dates from May 25 to August 25. Coding, design, documentation and other projects will be available. Applicants will be asked to select a project with one of the participating organizations and collaborate with a mentor listed for that project to make a relevant contribution to the project during the application process. Accepted participants will work remotely, while being guided by their mentor, and will receive a $5,500 stipend.

About Outreachy

Outreachy is the successor of the Outreach Program for Women (OPW). OPW was inspired by Google Summer of Code and by how few women applied for it. The GNOME Foundation first started OPW with one round in 2006, and then resumed the effort in 2010 with rounds organized twice a year. In the May 2012 round, Software Freedom Conservancy joined OPW with one internship with the Twisted project. In the January 2013 round, many other free and open source organizations joined the program. For the May 2015 round, the program was renamed to Outreachy with the goal of expanding to engage people from various underrepresented groups and is transitioning to Conservancy as its organizational home.

This program is a welcoming link that connects talented and passionate newcomers with people working in free and open source software and guides them through their first contribution. Through Outreachy, participants learn how exciting and valuable work on software freedom can be, while helping us to build a more inclusive community. The organizational partners of the program are the GNOME Foundation, Red Hat and Software Freedom Conservancy.

About the GNOME Foundation

GNOME was started in 1997 by two then-university students, Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero. Their aim: to produce a free (as in freedom) desktop environment. Since then, GNOME has grown into a hugely successful enterprise. Used by millions of people around the world, it is one of the most popular environments for GNU/Linux and UNIX-type operating systems. GNOME’s software has been utilized in successful, large-scale enterprise and public deployments.

The GNOME community is made up of hundreds of contributors from all over the world, many of whom are volunteers. This community is supported by the GNOME Foundation, an independent non-profit organization that provides financial, organizational and legal assistance. The Foundation is a democratic institution that is directed by its members, who are all active GNOME contributors. GNOME and its Foundation work to promote software freedom through the creation of innovative, accessible, and beautiful user experiences.

About Software Freedom Conservancy

Software Freedom Conservancy is a public charity that promotes, improves, develops and defends Free, Libre and Open Source software projects. Conservancy is home more than thirty software projects — including Git, Inkscape, Samba, Wine, Selenium, the Linux Compliance project, PyPy, and Sugar Labs — each supported by a dedicated community of volunteers, developers and users. Conservancy’s projects include some of the most widely used software systems in the world across many application areas, including educational software deployed in schools around the globe, embedded software systems deployed in most consumer electronic devices, distributed version control developer tools, integrated library services systems, and widely used graphics and art programs. A full list of Conservancy’s member projects is available. Conservancy provides these projects with the necessary infrastructure and not-for-profit support services to enable each project’s communities to focus on what they do best: creating innovative software and advancing computing for the public’s benefit.

Docker-Rocket Conflict is a Good Sign

2014 saw the rise of Docker, and ended with appropriately inflated hype and hysteria around a related container technology: Rocket. Immediately, discussions of uncertainty and doubt, and the familiar fear of forking unfolded. Was it only a matter of time before some developers or organizations splintered off from the Docker community with their own container technology?