The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.1

Immediately available for Linux, MacOS X and Windows

wall51smallBerlin, February 10, 2016 – The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.1, a full featured open source office suite which compares head-to-head with every product in the same category, while standing out with superior interoperability features.

LibreOffice 5.1 offers a completely reorganized user interface, and several improved features targeted at enterprise deployments: better support for ODF 1.2, interoperability with proprietary document formats and file management on remote servers.

LibreOffice has been downloaded 120 million times since the launch in January 2011. The office suite is deployed by large organizations in every continent, with …

Sliske’s Scoreboard | Weekly D&D

Earn XP lamps and begin to uncover what Sliske is up to!

BTS Video | Sliske’s Scoreboard

Also featuring Gone in Sliske Seconds with Mod Osborne & RuneMetrics Q&A Recap.

GNOME: Endless joins the GNOME Advisory Board

ORINDA, CA – February 3, 2016 – The GNOME Foundation is pleased to announce that Endless, creator of the Endless computer and operating system, has joined the GNOME Foundation advisory board. The Advisory Board is a body of stakeholder organizations and companies who support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation. The board includes Google, Intel, the Linux Foundation, and the Free Software Foundation, among others.

“We are very excited to join the GNOME Foundation advisory board,” said, Jonathan Blandford, VP Engineering at Endless and GNOME advisory board member. “The goals of the GNOME Foundation are perfectly aligned with the goals of Endless; to create a technology platform for the general public that is designed to be elegant, efficient, and easy to use.”

The Endless computer is the world’s first fully functioning desktop PC designed to bring the next four billion people into the information age.

“Endless is using GNOME in innovative ways to help close the digital divide. We’re excited to have them share their vision on the GNOME advisory board.” said Shaun McCance, President of the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors.

The nonprofit GNOME Foundation is an independent organization committed to supporting the advancement of the GNOME Project and software freedom. It provides financial, organizational and legal support to the GNOME Project and helps determine its vision and roadmap. GNOME software is used by millions of people around the world.

More information about GNOME and the GNOME Foundation can be found at www.gnome.org

WordPress 4.4.2 Security and Maintenance Release

WordPress 4.4.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. WordPress versions 4.4.1 and earlier are affected by two security issues: a possible XSS for certain local URIs, reported by Ronni Skansing; and an open redirection attack, reported by Shailesh Suthar. Thank you […]

Luca Toma KDE Interview


Luca Toma

Google Code In is our annual project to give tasks to school pupils to contribute to KDE projects. One task this year is to write a Dot article and top Code In student Stanford L has interviewed WikiToLearn contributor and Sysadmin Luca Toma.

Please tell us a little about yourself
I am a second year physics student studying at the University of Milan Bicocca. I’ve been passionate about computers since the age of 10, especially the part of sysadmin / networking.

What do you do for a living?
Currently, I am a student and I work within an office that deals with management of business systems and website development.

What do you do for KDE?

At this time my contribution in KDE is WikiToLearn, my role is the system administrator. I take care of the maintenance of the infrastructure and server project.

How did you get into computer programming?
I started programming when I was 12 years of age, I was intrigued by a friend working on a GNU/Linux distribution using Bash, just like in the movies. I started with VB6, after which was passed on to C / C ++, in order and PHP.

Do you have any advice for people who would like to pursue computer programming as a major?
My advice is to write the code on what you know to be able to understand what you want and to be able to make the most out of it.

Who is your role model, and why?
I do not have a well-defined role model because I try to take inspiration from the best of all. Einstein created a model for what concerns thinking in their own way and I think it is extremely important to be able to solve problems in the best way.

What are some ways you motivate yourself?
One thing that motivates me is to do my best.
I think if each one of us always did their best in situations, it would be the best for everyone.

Do you have a vision, like where do you want KDE in general to be in 5 years and sysadmin in particular?
I hope that KDE will become a reference point for all those who want to learn computer science.
A community that is able to support projects (e.g. WikiToLearn) while providing all necessary resources, both in terms of computing power, and that of access to the necessary knowledge but also as a community in which to grow.
From the perspective of a sysadmin, to be able to provide the right environment is necessary to continue and pursue their development

Introducing a new Community Initiatives Process

One of the most important lessons of 2015 for the Engineering Team here at the Drupal Association is that we need better ways to engage with you, the community. We realized we need better tools and ways to communicate with you about our current priorities, how you can influence those priorities, and how you can help make Drupal.org and the Drupal project better than ever.

All of the work we do stems from the mission of the Drupal Association. It’s our duty and responsibility to unite a global open source community to build and promote Drupal. As the home of that community, and the codebase, Drupal.org is perhaps the most critical piece of that mission, and at the most basic level all of the initiatives we prioritize must support that goal.

As part of reviewing our work in 2015, and in the interests of being transparent with the Drupal Community, we revamped the Drupal.org Roadmap. As you can see, we chose to focus on the few, most important initiatives that we have the capacity to execute on in the near term. We’re also including upcoming initiatives that we will move into as the active work is completed, but not as many as we had previously displayed. An important lesson of the past year is that we have to be Agile on the macro scale as well as on the micro. The needs of the community can change rapidly and we need to be able to respond.

Current

These are the initiatives the Drupal Association technology staff is focused on now.

Next

These are the initiatives the Drupal Association staff will work on or support once the Current initiatives are completed. The order of these initiatives may change.

We’ve also added some new iconography to indicate where some of these initiatives come from.

Initiatives with the tools ( ) icon represent essential support and maintenance work. This can mean paying down technical debt in the Drupal.org codebase, performing server maintenance, or implementing cost saving measures to help fund the rest of our mission driven work.

Initiatives with the community ( ) icon represent initiatives that were directly proposed by members of the community and/or are being supported by volunteer work from the community.

Don’t all the initiatives come from the community?

Yes, all of our priorities come from the needs of the community – but the community is a loose collective of many different groups of people with many different needs and priorities.

The needs of Drupal newcomers are vastly different from those of the Drupal Core Maintainers. The needs of our documentation editors are different from the needs of those providing support on the forums. And all of these needs must cohere with a larger product and design vision for Drupal.org to make this home of the community a cohesive, efficient, and beautiful place to be.

The Drupal Association Engineering Team can be thought of as the maintainers for Drupal.org and the sub-sites. It’s our duty to synthesize these diverse needs and to prioritize the major initiatives that will have the highest impact for the community. It’s also our job to make the architectural decisions for Drupal.org to ensure that every aspect of the site is functional/useable, consistent, and maintainable.

Most of our priorities, therefore, we set ourselves by bringing all of these factors together and doing the best we can to have the biggest impact, not just on the most vocal parts of the community, but also on those parts that are sometimes siloed or overlooked.

All that said, the community is absolutely a vital part of creating our initiatives. The maintainers for any other project on Drupal.org do not act alone – they accept feedback and contributions from other contributors, while at the same time making key architectural decisions, reviewing patches, and ultimately deploying that work in the form of new releases. We do the same with our initiatives.

Community Volunteers and Community Initiatives

There are two ways that members of the community can have a direct influence on the Roadmap for Drupal.org. These methods have existed informally in the past, but in 2016 we’d like to beta test some new ideas to make these processes more formal, consistent, and transparent.

The first way is to volunteer your expertise to help with one of the existing initiatives we already have prioritized, or even to offer your expertise without a particular contribution in mind. There is a strong record of community volunteers helping to improve Drupal.org, just a few examples from the last year include: u/mlhess and u/nnewton helping with infrastructure; to u/michelle helping to clean up spam; to u/dddave and others in the webmasters queue; or u/mshmsh5000 who helped with Drupal Jobs feature development.

If you have expertise (and not just in code!) and are ready for guidance from the Drupal Association engineering team as to how you can help, you can offer your assistance as a volunteer.

Learn about Volunteering

I should also note – we strongly encourage most volunteers to first consider giving back to the Drupal project itself, but we are certainly happy for help with Drupal.org

The second way to influence the Drupal.org roadmap is to develop a community initiative. If you (and perhaps a small team of others in the community) have some expertise in a particular area, and have a particular initiative in mind that you would like to work on, you can propose a community initiative.

View Community Initiatives

Community initiatives come in all shapes in sizes: from documentation audits with the help of u/dead_arm; to adding two factor authentication to Drupal.org with u/coltrane; to a much larger task like building and deploying DrupalCI with the help of u/jthorson, u/nickscuch, u/ricardoamaro, u/bastianwidmer and several others. Some initiatives affect a subset of the community, project maintainers, for example, whereas others may affect almost every user.

Why this new process?

The hard lesson we’ve learned over the course of the past year is that we need to be involved early. Even in cases where the community volunteers driving an initiative forward are experts in their area – if Association staff are not involved early in the architectural and planning decisions then what should be a positive, collaborative effort is often slowed down by architectural refactoring and design decision backtracks. That is not fun for anybody, and our immense respect for our community collaborators requires that we set them up for success by getting involved early.

As such, our new community initiatives process has several steps:

  1. Community members plan their contribution in an issue, and identify who (if anyone) is able to volunteer some time to make the contribution.
  2. The community members propose their initiative to the Association – so that we can evaluate it for inclusion on our roadmap. This may include a call with the community members proposing the initiative to talk it through in greater detail.
  3. Association staff evaluate the initiative: prioritize it into the roadmap, postpone it, or–if necessary– reject initiatives that are not a good fit.
  4. Prioritized community initiatives are rolled into the larger Drupal.org roadmap, and monthly or bi-monthly community initiative meetings are scheduled to ensure the work moves forward.
  5. A liaison from the Association engineering team is assigned, to help coordinate architectural decisions, to provide support and access as needed, and to coordinate with the larger team when it is time for the work to be reviewed.

This process is time intensive – and so in general we expect to be able to run only one or maybe two community initiatives at a time, in parallel with our other work. We realize this may be frustrating, but the last year has shown that our most successful initiatives required this close coordination.

This process is new, and will evolve

Finding a good process for working closely with such a diverse and passionate community is not easy—and we aren’t assuming that this new process will be perfect. We’re going to trial this new community initiative process in 2016 with the goal of increasing the transparency of how we prioritize our work, and how the community can help us build a better Drupal.org. We are committed to making this process better.

GNOME: GNOME Foundation was never bankrupt

We are aware that there have been references online claiming that the GNOME Foundation was bankrupted in 2013 along with accusations about who was responsible.

To clarify the matter, the Foundation was never bankrupt. Quite a while ago, there was a temporary cash flow issue which is now completely resolved. Funds that were committed by sponsors and earmarked for the Outreach Program for Women (OPW) were delayed in payment. GNOME Foundation’s board temporarily froze expenditures while it collected the funds and revamped its financial procedures to adjust for the additional cash flow going forward. Every cent of the funds was ultimately received. Additionally, GNOME collected administrative fees which covered the program’s expenses.

Karen Sandler, our former Executive Director, made certain there were firm financial commitments from OPW sponsors prior to authorizing outgoing payments and she further ensured that all funds were ultimately recouped. While we were disappointed when Karen chose to leave the Foundation for a new position at the Software Freedom Conservancy, she has the full support of the GNOME community who elected her onto the Board of Directors in 2014. We are grateful for her continued involvement with Foundation activities on a voluntary basis after her term on the Board, as well as being a Free Software advocate and pro-bono lawyer for us and other projects.

While OPW has transferred to another home which is more suited to the program’s size and breadth, we remain an active partner of the program and are proud to support it.

2016 Nominations Open for Drupal Association At-Large Director

Overview

It’s a great time to be part of the Drupal Association. We’ve done some amazing work in the last few years, and we’re in a great position to work with the community to continue to improve and grow fully into our mission. As a Drupal Association At-Large Director, you’d be in the center of the action. The At-large Director position is specifically designed to ensure community representation on the Drupal Association board and we strongly encourage anyone with an interest to nominate themselves today.

Nominate Yourself Today

The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day to day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc. You can learn more about what’s expected of a board member in this post and presentation.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend two in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required). All board members agree to meet the minimum requirements documented in the board member agreement.

Today we are opening the self-nomination form that allows you to throw your hat in the ring. We’re looking to elect one candidate this year to serve a two-year term.

How to Nominate Yourself

To nominate yourself, you should be prepared to answer a few questions:

  • About Me: Tell us about yourself! Your background, how you got into Drupal, etc.
  • Motivation: Why are you applying for a board position? What initiatives do you hope to help drive, or what perspectives are you going to try and represent?
  • Experience: What Drupal community contributions have you taken part in (code, camps, etc.)? Do you have experience in financial oversight, developing business strategies, or organization governance?
  • Availability: I am able to travel to three in-person board meetings per year (either self-funded, or with financial sponsorship)
  • IRC Handle
  • Twitter Handle

We’ve also made a few changes to the process based on community feedback from the 2015 election:

  • We now display your username, not your given name, on your candidate profile to address privacy concerns that had been raised. Nominees should note that given names are required on legal documentation such as our 990 IRS filings, but we will do our best to preserve your privacy where we can. 
  • Updated sidebar block has more information about the elections, making it easier to the information you need. 
  • When you nominate yourself we will ask if you would like to opt-in to share your election results data. Last year was the first time we published full results from the vote data. Candidates that opt-in will have their name displayed next to their vote counts, as in this example from 2015.

We will also need to know that you are available for the next step in the process, meet the candidate sessions. We are hosting 3 sessions: 

Meet the Candidate Web Conferences:

Session One
Tue 23 Feb 2016 at 16:00 UTC

  • 7 AM PST Tue 23 Feb, US and Canada
  • 10 AM EST Tue 23 Feb, US and Canada
  • 1 PM Tue 23 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 3 PM Tue 23 Feb, London
  • 11 PM Tue 23 Feb, Beijing

Session Two
Wed 24 Feb 2016 at 21:00 UTC

  • 12 PM PST Wed 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 3 PM EST Wed 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 5 PM Wed 24 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 8 PM Wed 24 Feb, London
  • 4 AM Thu 26 Feb, Beijing
  • 7 AM Thu 26 Feb, Sydney Australia

Session Three
Thu 25 Feb 2016 at 01:00 UTC

  • 4:00 PM PST Thu 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 7:00 PM EST Thu 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 9:00 PM Thu 25 Feb, Sau Paulo Brasil
  • 12:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, London
  • 8:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, Beijing
  • 11:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, Sydney Australia

The nomination form will be open February 1, 2016 through February 20, 2016 at midnight UTC. For a thorough review of the process, please see the elections home page.

If you have any questions, please contact Holly Ross, Drupal Association Executive Director. For the sake of keeping conversational threads in one place, the comments on this news item have been closed. Please comment on the original post on the Drupal Association website.

Flickr photo: Clyde Robinson

Front page news: 

FOSDEM: Announcing KDE neon

At FOSDEM this weekend KDE is announcing our newest project, KDE neon. Neon will provide a way to get the latest KDE software on the day its released.
More than ever people expect a stable desktop with cutting-edge features, all in a package which is…

FCM#105 is OUT!

This month: * Command & Conquer * How-To : Python in the Real World, LibreOffice, Migrating From VAX and Using GnuCash * Graphics : Inkscape and Creating A Valentines Card In LaTeX. * Chrome Cult: Cloud Distros * Linux Labs: Building A 3D Printer * Ubuntu Phones: OTA-9 * Review: MyGica ATV582 TV Box *

Behind the Scenes – February 2016

Nomad’s Elegy is the tip of the action-packed February iceberg!

Walmart Opens OneOps Cloud Management to the Masses

Walmart on Tuesday announced that it has posted the code for its OneOps cloud application life cycle management platform on GitHub. The company developed OneOps for building and launching cloud applications across frequently changing storage environments. It lets e-commerce vendors deploy apps on platforms from Microsoft, Rackspace and CenturyLink to OpenStack private or hybrid environments.

Firefox Can Now Get Push Notifications From Your Favorite Sites

UPDATED TO CLARIFY HOW TO MANAGE PUSH NOTIFICATIONS Firefox for Windows, Mac and Linux now lets you choose to receive push notifications from websites if you give them permission. This is similar to Web notifications, except now you can receive … Continue reading

GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board Meeting of January, 12th, 2016

= Minutes for Tuesday, January 12th 2016, 20:00 UTC =

Next meeting date Tuesday, 19 January, 20:00 UTC

== Attending ==

* Jeff F.T.
* Rosanna Yuen
* Alexandre Franke
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Allan Day
* Shaun McCance
* Andrea Veri

== Regrets …

GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board Meeting of January, 05th, 2016

= Minutes for Tuesday, January 5th 2016, 20:00 UTC =

Next meeting date Tuesday, 12 January, 20:00 UTC

== Attending ==

* Jeff F.T.
* Cosimo Cecchi
* Rosanna Yuen
* Alexandre Franke
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Allan Day
* Shaun McCance

== Regrets…

GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board Meeting of December, 22th, 2015

= Minutes for Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015, 20:00 UTC =

Next meeting date Tuesday, 5 January, 20:00 UTC

== Attending ==

* Allan Day
* Cosimo Cecchi
* Rosanna Yuen
* Alexandre Franke
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Jeff F.T.

== Regrets ==

* Shaun M…

Snap-Happy Trojan Targets Linux Servers

Security researchers at Dr.Web on Tuesday revealed details of the Trojan Linux.Ekoms.1, which takes screen shots and records audio to acquire sensitive and personal information, mostly from Linux servers. Malware for Linux is becoming more diverse and includes spyware programs, ransomware and Trojans designed to carry out distributed denial-of-service attacks, according to Dr.Web.

Development: GNOME 3.19.4 released

Hi!,

GNOME 3.19.4 is out. This is a development snapshot, so use it with caution.

To compile GNOME 3.19.4, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2]
(which use the exact tarball versions from the official release).

You can also test the latest code…

Zero-Day Flaw Puts Millions of Linux Machines, Android Devices at Risk

Tens of millions of Linux PCs and servers, as well as 66 percent of all Android mobile devices, are vulnerable to a zero-day flaw that could allow users with lower-level privileges to gain root access, according to Perception Point, which announced its discovery last week. The local privilege escalation vulnerability, which affects Linux Kernel v3.8 and higher, has existed since 2012, the firm said.