GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board meeting of May 20th, 2014

wiki: https://wiki.gnome.org/FoundationBoard/Minutes/20140520

= Minutes for Tuesday, May 20th, 2014, 16:00 UTC =

== Next meeting ==
* Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014, 16:00 UTC

== Attending ==
* Andreas Nilsson
* Marina Zhurakhinskaya
* Tobias Mueller

KDE Commit-Digest for 4th May 2014

In this week’s KDE Commit-Digest:
KDE-PIM sees huge performance improvement for POP3 users with large maildirs
KAddressbook adds a category filter
Krita implements support for more types of palettes
Also in Calligra, Docx export filter has partial supp…

KDE Commit-Digest for 27th April 2014

In this week’s KDE Commit-Digest:
Umbrello adds find text in tree view, current diagram and all diagrams feature
KDE Telepathy can share images over common image sharing networks
Sflphone-kde adds security evaluation framework with GUI
Punctuation data…

OpenXcom hits 1.0

We have previously mentioned OpenXcom on several occasions before, but now the massive UFO: Enemy Unknown engine reimplementation project finally hit the long-awaited 1.0 mark, and they decided to celebrate by releasing this lovely trailer that sums up…

Randa Meetings Interview One: Cristian Oneț


Cristian Oneț

This is one of our first interviews with the excited attendees of the Randa meetings and today you shall get a glimpse into the mind, workings and makings of Cristian Oneț who has been with KDE since quite some time now and has been a prominent contributor.

Could you describe yourself in a few lines and tell us where you’re from?

My name is Cristian Oneț, I’m a software developer. I live in Timișoara, Romania. At my day job I work on developing/maintaining a suite of desktop applications on Windows (using Qt lately). I’m also a member of the KMyMoney development team.

How did you first chance upon KDE? Could you describe your journey in short?

My first contact with KDE was back in the 3.x days (I think it was 3.2). I was just starting to get familiar with Linux (first years at the Computer Science Faculty) and I was looking for a desktop that looked and felt good. KDE’s workspace was my pick then and it stayed that way ever since.

Why is KDE so special to you?

It’s the most visible part of my computer. By using it and contributing to its improvement it allowed me to grow as a developer. It feels good to be able contribute to something you find useful and to do it in a fun way.

Will this be your first time in Randa?

Yes it’s my first time.

When did you first hear about the meetings in Randa and why do you wish to be a part of it?

I’ve heard about previous meetings in Randa from reading Planet KDE. I didn’t really think that I’ll ever participate but this year I was contacted by Mario Fux with the proposal to help port KMyMoney to KF5. After a short exchange of e-mails I decided that it would be nice to be there.

Which specific area of KDE software do you contribute to? Could you give a brief overview?

I’m a part of the team that develops KMyMoney the KDE personal finances manager application. I also had small contributions (mostly small patches) in other parts of KDE software (kdepim, kdelibs), most of these were fixes for problems that I encountered using KDE software or developing KMyMoney. Last but not least, I also contributed with Romanian translations since I believe that software should be properly internationalized.

As a KMyMoney developer one of the biggest task that I contributed to was porting it to KDE Platform 4. This was a great chance to get familiar with Qt’s MVC programming. That period was one of the biggest wave of development on the project lately. After porting the application to KDE Platform 4 the port to Windows followed. That was also fun since I got to know some KDE Windows project members on the way.

How do you manage to balance your job and contribution to KDE?

I try to do both in a way that makes me happy with the work I’m doing. My KDE contribution can keep me happy as a developer which is not always possible at my job. There is also a limit to what I can do when it comes to contribution and if the time’s consumed by my job I can’t really contribute much. I’m usually productive as an Open Source contributor after my summer holiday. Contributions are also influenced by the feedback of the community and the development team. I find that it is usually easier to fix problems that effect a lot of people.

You work on the windows platform during your job and have an in-depth understanding of it. But you prefer to use Linux as your primary OS. Could you give us a few reasons why someone should make the switch to Open Source?

Yes, I always preferred Linux but that preference is pretty influenced by the way I relate to computers. I think that anyone who desires freedom of information should use Open Source, but of course, this is a disputable statement. The counter argument would be that one is only free if he has the knowledge and time to fix stuff that’s broken. It’s nice that the knowledge is out there but that does not really help somebody who just needs things to work.

I came a long way learning about computers by using Linux (Gentoo Linux that is) and I’m thankful for that. Still, I find myself once in a while after an update mumbling about some stuff that just broke because somebody thought it should be re-written from scratch. Not trying to send forth a wrong message, I know that there are problems on other platforms as well but on Linux they tend to be more frequent (probably caused by the faster release cycles). That’s when the freedom to change stuff gets handy.

As a person who has been with KDE since his student days; what would your advice be to the students who are currently contributing to KDE to keep them motivated to continue development when they start working on a fully fledged job?

I would advise them to do what they enjoy doing. If they enjoy contributing to Open Source now then that probably won’t change and they will keep doing it after they have a job. If they really enjoy Open Source they could be looking for a job on an Open Source project if they have the opportunity. Meeting the people they work with in Open Source could be also creating a kind of connection that would keep them contributing even when they have less free time in the future. Last but not least Open Source can be a kind of “escape” where one can really do the things they like when there is no such freedom at a job.


The Randa Meetings organizers use KMyMoney for their finances.

Since you are working on KMyMoney on both Windows and Linux could you describe the particulars of the development process in both and which one you prefer to work on?

I only developed KMyMoney on Linux, on Windows I only work on platform specific issues. But I can compare the two development platforms using the experience I have in C++ development on Windows at my job. My opinion is that except for the debugger; the tools on Linux are much more developer friendly. I use KDevelop, I love it’s syntax highlighting, symbol navigation and documentation features but it still crashes once in a while (mainly while switching branches in Git). It’s great to edit code but the integration with gdb does not seem so smooth as Microsoft Visual Studio’s debugger. Code highlighting and navigation can also be improved on Windows with some add-ons. I have heard a lot about Qt Designer but I really like KDevelop and I can live with the debugger (it works 90 % of the time).

The KDE Platform is still pretty unstable on Windows and this was causing a lot of issues with the deployment once the application was ported. I guess this is caused by the fact that KDE software is mainly developed on Linux. The KDE on Windows team did a great job of trying to patch things to make them work on Windows but it seems it’s hard to keep up with the pace KDE software is being developed. That’s why, once we had our hands on a good KDE Windows release (that was 4.10.5 but it still needed custom patches), we stuck with it in the standalone installer that we provide. I would like KDE to focus on making the platform more stable than always looking at the next big thing in UI design.

I think that on Windows users only care about applications, if they would like to use the whole desktop they would definitely switch to Linux.

So the answer to your question is: I prefer to develop on Linux but I would also like the framework to be cross platform and so I would like to contribute to improve this situation.

Have you got anything in particular planned for Randa?

As I mentioned earlier hopefully I will be able to finish my task of porting KMyMoney to KF5 as well as meet KDE Windows project members, learn how KF5 will improve packaging on Windows and have fun while doing all that.

What will you be looking forward to the most in the Randa Sprint? Any expectations or hopes of what it will be like? Any particular people or projects you are looking to collaborate on/with in Randa? Any targets set on completing with respect to development?

The most interesting will be meeting the people that attend. I would start with some KDE Windows project members since I’ve been working with some of them while we ported KMyMoney to Windows. Packaging on Windows is still pretty hard so I would expect this to be improved. I would like to discuss about this and see if I could contribute since I’m at home in C++ development on Windows (it’s my job).

What does KDE mean to you and what role has it played in shaping you as a contributor/developer?

It’s my desktop of choice which I’ve been using for more than 10 years now. I really enjoy working with KDE/Qt as a developer since I think both have some of the most well designed API in the world of C++ frameworks/libraries. Since we use Qt at my job it was pretty useful to have previously worked with it.

Why do you think Meetings such as Randa are very important for KDE and for Open Source communities around the globe?

I’ve participated only once at a KDE related developer meeting. It was the KDE Finances Sprint in 2010. I felt that it was really nice that I could meet the people I was working with face to face. Such a meeting can create different kind of connections than an acquaintance using the usual (e-mail, irc) communication channels.

Why do you think supporting them is of importance and how has the support helped you as a KDE developer and an Open Source contributor?

Building on my previous answer I think that it’s important to build well knit teams. People who meet in person work better together, at least that is the experience I’ve had while working on KMyMoney.  Our meeting gave the team a big boost so if KDE is to move forward at a good pace it needs to encourage and support developer meetings. As for me as a developer it was a real pleasure to get to know my colleagues who came from different parts of the world to see the similarities and the differences between us.

Could you briefly describe a rough outline of what you’d imagine your typical day in Randa this time around to be?

I guess it will be similar to the days we had at the KDE Finances sprint. After breakfast meetings, lunch then meetings again then some socializing over a beer in the evening.

Is this your first time to Switzerland? Are you excited about being in another country?

Yes, I’ve never been to Switzerland before, being able to visit it was one of the reasons I’ve decided to attend the meeting. At first I’ve declined since the period was overlapping with my family holiday but after I found out that it would be OK to spend a few days working at the meeting and the rest I could spend with my wife (we will be there together) I’ve decided to go.

Thanks a lot, Cristian, for your time for the interview and dedication to KMyMoney and the KDE community.

Please support us in the organization of the Randa Meetings 2014.

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Wine 1.7.20 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.20 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

X11 drag & drop fixes.
A few more C/C++ runtime functions.
Fixes for various memory issues found by Valgrind.
Some OLE storage fixes.
Various bug fixes….

BTS Video 109 – Legacy Mode Beta

Take a Behind the Scenes tour of Legacy Mode’s key features – along with some of the combat tweaks coming with it – before the beta launch on Monday.

Drupal.org Maintenance: June 16th 4PM PDT (June 16th 23:00 UTC)

Drupal.org will be affected by our ISP’s maintenance window starting Monday, June 16th, 16:00 PDT (June 16th, 23:00 UTC) and ending Monday, June 16th, 18:00 PDT (June 17th, 01:00 UTC).

Our ISP will be upgrading the firmware on the customer aggregation routers, and we expect to see a 10‒15 minute disruption in traffic sometime during the maintenance window.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Joomla! 2.5.22 Released

Joomla! 2.5The Joomla Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Joomla 2.5.22.  This is a maintenance release for the 2.5 series of the Joomla! CMS addressing a fatal error introduced into the contact form in the 2.5.21 release yesterday.

The update process is very simple, and complete instructions are available here. Note that there are now easier and better ways of updating than copying the files with FTP.

Download

New Installations: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.22 (Full package) »

Update Package: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.22 (Update package) »

Note: Please read the update instructions before updating.

Instructions

*Please clear your browser’s cache after upgrading

Want to test drive Joomla? Try the online demo. Documentation is available for beginners.

Release Notes

Check the Joomla 2.5.22 Post-Release FAQs to see if there are important items and helpful hints discovered after the release.

Statistics for the 2.5.22 release period

How can you help Joomla! development?

There are a variety of ways in which you can get actively involved with Joomla! It doesn’t matter if you are a coder, an integrator, or merely a user of Joomla!. You can contact the Joomla! Community Development Manager, David Hurley, to get more information, or if you are ready you can jump right into the Joomla! Bug Squad.

The Joomla! Bug Squad is one of the most active teams in the Joomla! development process and is always looking for people (not just developers) that can help with sorting bug reports, coding patches and testing solutions. It’s a great way for increasing your working knowledge of Joomla!, and also a great way to meet new people from all around the world.

If you are interested, please read about us on the Joomla! Documentation Wiki and, if you wish to join, email Mark Dexter or Nick Savov, our Bug Squad co-coordinators.

You can also help Joomla! development by thanking those involved in the many areas of the process. In the past year, for example, over 1,000 bugs have been fixed by the Bug Squad.

Contributors

Thank you to the code contributors and active Bug Squad members that created and tested this release:

Abd Al-Mageed Suckar, Achal Aggarwal, Angel Toribio, Bastian W, Ben Tasker, Benjamin Trenkle, Bernard Saulme, Brian Teeman, Camden Narzt, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Chris Davenport, Christopher Masters, Daniel Sloof, David Jardin, Dennis Hermacki, Edwin Cheront, Elijah Madden, Florian Dal Fitto, George Wilson, Hannes Papenberg, Hans Kuijpers, Håvard Kristoffersen, Izhar Aazmi, Jean-Marie Simonet, Jelle Kok, Jisse Reitsma, Juelis Junior, Jurian Even, Klas Berlič, Kristijan Zivcec, Leo Lammerink, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Nha Bui, Nicholas Dionysopoulos, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Ove Eriksson, Ozan Ozkan, Patrick Alt, Peter Lose, Peter van Westen, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Pruteanu Alexandru, Richard McDaniel, Robert Deutz, Roberto Segura, Roelf Pringle, Roland Dalmulder, Sebastien Heraud, Sergey Gribinichenko, Sergio Manzi, Seyi Awofadeju, Simon Asika, Stefania Gaianigo, Stefano Storti, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Joomla! Bug Squad

Thank you to the Joomla! Bug Squad for their dedicated efforts investigating reports, fixing problems, and applying patches to Joomla. If you find a bug in Joomla!, please report it on the Joomla! CMS Issue Tracker.

Active members of the Joomla! Bug Squad during past 3 months include: Achal Aggarwal, Andrea Zagli, Anibal Sanchez, Beat , Benjamin Trenkle, Brad Markle, Brian Teeman, Chris Davenport, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Dan Walker, David Jardin, Demis Palma, Dennis Hermacki, Dimitris Grammatikos, Elijah Madden, George Wilson, Hans Kuijpers, Hugo Avila, Itamar Elharar, Jean-Marie Simonet, jelle kok, Jurian Even, Lara Petersen, Leo Lammerink, Marc Antoine Thevenet, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Mikhail M, Mohamed Infaz, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Peter Lose, Peter Martin, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Robert Gastaud, Roberto Segura, Roland Dalmulder, Sander Potjer, Sergio Manzi, Stefania Gaianigo, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Tom Hutchison, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Bug Squad Leadership: Mark Dexter and Nick Savov, Co-Coordinators.

Joomla! Security Strike Team

A big thanks to the Joomla! Security Strike Team for their ongoing work to keep Joomla! secure. Members include: Airton Torres, Alan Langford, Beat, Bill Richardson, Claire Mandville, David Hurley, Don Gilbert, Gary Brooks, Jason Kendall, Javier Gomez, Jean-Marie Simonet, Marijke Stuivenberg, Mark Boos, Mark Dexter, Matias Griese, Michael Babker, Nick Savov, Pushapraj Sharma, Roberto Segura, Rouven Weßling, Thomas Hunziker.

Treasure Hunter: Large Gnomeball & Recolourable Kit

Show off your footwork with your Gielinor friends, in your team colours, with the large gnomeball – available this weekend on Treasure Hunter!

Legacy Mode Beta – Coming 16th June

Legacy Mode will be yours to test on our beta servers from Monday 16th June. Try out traditional RuneScape combat, special attacks and more.

Community Chronicle 12/06

There are events, videos, fan art and a haunting RuneScape ballad – all featured in this edition of the Community Chronicle.

Joomla! 3.3.1 Released

Joomla! 3.3 - Do More

The Joomla! Project and the Production Leadership Team are proud to announce the release of Joomla! 3.3.1. This is a maintenance release for the 3.x series of the Joomla! CMS.

If you are currently running a Joomla! release on a server with PHP 5.3.10 or later, we encourage you to update immediately to Joomla! 3.3.1 via either the one-click update or the update downloads available at http://www.joomla.org/download.html.

Note that in order to update directly to 3.3.1 via the core update component, you must be running 3.2.2 or later due to the raised minimum supported PHP version and the update system not supporting checking the server’s PHP version in older releases. Older 3.x releases will be prompted to update to 3.2.4 before being presented the 3.3.1 update.

Joomla! 2.5.21 Released

Joomla! 2.5The Joomla Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Joomla 2.5.21.  This is a maintenance release for the 2.5 series of the Joomla! CMS.

The update process is very simple, and complete instructions are available here. Note that there are now easier and better ways of updating than copying the files with FTP.

Download

New Installations: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.21 (Full package) »

Update Package: Click here to download Joomla 2.5.21 (Update package) »

Note: Please read the update instructions before updating.

Instructions

*Please clear your browser’s cache after upgrading

Want to test drive Joomla? Try the online demo. Documentation is available for beginners.

Release Notes

Check the Joomla 2.5.21 Post-Release FAQs to see if there are important items and helpful hints discovered after the release.

Statistics for the 2.5.21 release period

  • 5 tracker issues fixed

See http://developer.joomla.org/version-2-5-21-release-notes.html for details of the tracker items fixed.

How can you help Joomla! development?

There are a variety of ways in which you can get actively involved with Joomla! It doesn’t matter if you are a coder, an integrator, or merely a user of Joomla!. You can contact the Joomla! Community Development Manager, David Hurley, to get more information, or if you are ready you can jump right into the Joomla! Bug Squad.

The Joomla! Bug Squad is one of the most active teams in the Joomla! development process and is always looking for people (not just developers) that can help with sorting bug reports, coding patches and testing solutions. It’s a great way for increasing your working knowledge of Joomla!, and also a great way to meet new people from all around the world.

If you are interested, please read about us on the Joomla! Documentation Wiki and, if you wish to join, email Mark Dexter or Nick Savov, our Bug Squad co-coordinators.

You can also help Joomla! development by thanking those involved in the many areas of the process. In the past year, for example, over 1,000 bugs have been fixed by the Bug Squad.

Contributors

Thank you to the code contributors and active Bug Squad members that created and tested this release:

Abd Al-Mageed Suckar, Achal Aggarwal, Angel Toribio, Bastian W, Ben Tasker, Benjamin Trenkle, Bernard Saulme, Brian Teeman, Camden Narzt, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Chris Davenport, Christopher Masters, Daniel Sloof, David Jardin, Dennis Hermacki, Edwin Cheront, Elijah Madden, Florian Dal Fitto, George Wilson, Hannes Papenberg, Hans Kuijpers, Håvard Kristoffersen, Izhar Aazmi, Jean-Marie Simonet, Jelle Kok, Jisse Reitsma, Juelis Junior, Jurian Even, Klas Berlič, Kristijan Zivcec, Leo Lammerink, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Nha Bui, Nicholas Dionysopoulos, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Ove Eriksson, Ozan Ozkan, Patrick Alt, Peter Lose, Peter van Westen, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Pruteanu Alexandru, Richard McDaniel, Robert Deutz, Roberto Segura, Roelf Pringle, Roland Dalmulder, Sebastien Heraud, Sergey Gribinichenko, Sergio Manzi, Seyi Awofadeju, Simon Asika, Stefania Gaianigo, Stefano Storti, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Joomla! Bug Squad

Thank you to the Joomla! Bug Squad for their dedicated efforts investigating reports, fixing problems, and applying patches to Joomla. If you find a bug in Joomla!, please report it on the Joomla! CMS Issue Tracker.

Active members of the Joomla! Bug Squad during past 3 months include: Achal Aggarwal, Andrea Zagli, Anibal Sanchez, Beat , Benjamin Trenkle, Brad Markle, Brian Teeman, Chris Davenport, Christiane Maier-Stadtherr, Dan Walker, David Jardin, Demis Palma, Dennis Hermacki, Dimitris Grammatikos, Elijah Madden, George Wilson, Hans Kuijpers, Hugo Avila, Itamar Elharar, Jean-Marie Simonet, jelle kok, Jurian Even, Lara Petersen, Leo Lammerink, Marc Antoine Thevenet, Marcel van Beelen, Marco Richter, Matt Thomas, Michael Babker, Mikhail M, Mohamed Infaz, Nick Savov, Niels van der Veer, Peter Lose, Peter Martin, Peter Wiseman, Piotr Mocko, Robert Gastaud, Roberto Segura, Roland Dalmulder, Sander Potjer, Sergio Manzi, Stefania Gaianigo, Thomas Hunziker, Thomas Jackson, Tobias Zulauf, Todor Iliev, Tom Hutchison, Valentin Despa, Viktor Vogel.

Bug Squad Leadership: Mark Dexter and Nick Savov, Co-Coordinators.

Joomla! Security Strike Team

A big thanks to the Joomla! Security Strike Team for their ongoing work to keep Joomla! secure. Members include: Airton Torres, Alan Langford, Beat, Bill Richardson, Claire Mandville, David Hurley, Don Gilbert, Gary Brooks, Jason Kendall, Javier Gomez, Jean-Marie Simonet, Marijke Stuivenberg, Mark Boos, Mark Dexter, Matias Griese, Michael Babker, Nick Savov, Pushapraj Sharma, Roberto Segura, Rouven Weßling, Thomas Hunziker.

Krita Kicks Off 2.9 Development Effort with a Kickstarter Campaign


Krita Fundraiser on Kickstarter

Five years ago, the Krita team decided raise funds to raise Krita to the level of a professional applications . That fundraiser was successful beyond all expectations and enabled us to release Krita 2.4, the first version of Krita ready for professional artists!

Now, it’s time for another fundraiser, much, much more ambitious in scope! Dmitry Kazakov has worked full-time on Krita 2.8, and now we want him to work full-time on Krita 2.9, too. And it’s not just Dmitry: Sven, who has contributed to Krita for over ten years now, has recently finished university and is available as well.

So, we’ve setup a base goal that would cover Dmitry’s work, a stretch goal that would cover Sven’s work and a super-stretch goal that would cover porting Krita to the last remaining OS we don’t cover: OS X.

Since 2009, the Krita project has had three more sponsored projects, and all of them delivered: the Comics with Krita and Muses training DVD’s and Dmitry’s work on Krita 2.8. With Krita 2.4, Krita could be used by professional artists, with Krita 2.8, artists all over the world started taking notice and with 2.9, well — we’ll make Krita irresistible!

Help us spread the word and make this campaign a big success!

Dot Categories:

Elf City – Design Document 5

Today, we release the final document in our five part series. Inside you’ll find the juicy details on the Hefin and Meilyr clans.

Stay Connected to the Things you Love with Firefox

Firefox puts you in control of your Web experience and is easy to customize so you can use the Web the way you want. You can make Firefox your own through the beautifully designed and powerful customization menu. You can … Continue reading

Plasma 5 Second Beta Needs Testing

The next generation desktop from KDE is taking shape and the second beta is out now for testing. The developers have settled on a name – Plasma 5, and there is only one month to go until the first release so please test packages from your distro or do…

Ecommerce Success Story – An up close look at WishTrend’s tripling growth

WishTrend is a Seoul based PrestaShop store and an international retailer for Korean beauty products. In a country brimming with cosmetics, only a few major brands ever gain global exposure. Eddie and Ryan, cofounders of this online store, aimed to … Read more

Selling on Marketplaces: how to centralize your ecommerce inventory

In this day and age, selling on e-marketplaces has become relatively indispensable for small to large ecommerce business owners. Building an online presence on European platforms such as eBay, Amazon, Rakuten, Zalando or la Redoute, just to name a few, … Read more