GNOME Foundation: Minutes of the Board Meeting of February, 27th, 2015

= Minutes for Friday, February 27th, 2015, 17:00 UTC =

Next meeting due on March 13th, 2015 at 17:00 UTC

== Attending ==
* Ekaterina Gerasimova
* Rosanna Yuen
* Marina Zhurakhinskaya
* Jeff Fortin
* Sriram Ramkrishna
* Karen Sandler
* Andrea V…

Development: GNOME 3.15.92 Release Candidate

Hello all,

We have now reached the end of the development cycle and here comes
a release candidate for you to download, build, and test. Enjoy it
as fast as you can, the final release is scheduled next Wednesday.

To compile GNOME 3.15.92, you can us…

Drupal 7.35 and 6.35 released

Drupal 7.35 and Drupal 6.35, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.35 and Drupal 6.35 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.35Download Drupal 6.35
Upg…

Now accepting Google Summer of Code student applications

GSoC logo

Attention prospective Google Summer of Code students: the student applications window has begun.

If you haven’t contacted the relevant KDE subproject yet (including umbrella projects Kubuntu and Calamares) to submit your proposal for review, it is high time to do so. Take a look at our Google Summer of Code project ideas page, pick one or more of our exciting project ideas, dazzle us with your proposal and hack your way to ultimate glory this summer! A nice paycheck is also part of the deal.

If you have already received feedback and you feel your proposal is in good shape, we encourage you to officially submit it now to Google Melange.

Submitting early means your proposal might get more attention, and you will be able to edit it until the end of the student applications period. The deadline for student applications is March 27, 2015.

Mentors: interest from prospective students has been significant, and we’ll need to match those students with mentors. Offering more mentors might increase the number of student slots we get from Google, so if you are an established KDE developer and you are interested in giving a helping hand with Google Summer of Code, please sign up to be a mentor on Google Melange as soon as possible.

MantisBT 1.3.0-beta.2 Released

This is the second beta release for the MantisBT v1.3. There has been a bunch of fixes (see changelog) since beta-1. Following is a list of changes that are included in v1.3 compared to 1.2.x stable release for the benefit … Continue reading

Please welcome David Bryant, Vice President of Platform Engineering

I’m excited to announce that David Bryant is joining Mozilla today as our new Vice President of Platform Engineering. David will be based in our headquarters in Mountain View, California. David was most recently at Nokia where he served as … Continue reading

GNOME: GNOME supports GPL compliance through VMware suit

The GNOME Foundation supports the Software Freedom Conservancy in its efforts to ensure compliance with the GNU General Public License (GPL) through Christoph Hellwig’s lawsuit against VMware. Like the Linux kernel, the GNOME Project chooses the GPL (as well as the LGPL) to license our software. Working in Free Software is a collaborative effort where all parties benefit, but this outcome is only realized if there is cooperation. Both the GPL and copyleft make this collaboration possible. The GPL is an important tool for safeguarding Free Software and when other avenues for cooperation have been exhausted litigation is the only recourse.

Development: TARBALLS DUE: 3.15.92

Hi!

Please do your best to keep this Monday deadline, it really helps the
work of the release team.

Thank you all!

Fred

World Wine News Issue 387

WWN Issue 387 was released today.

Wine in Buildroot
Weekly AppDB/Bugzilla Status Changes

Development: GNOME 3.15.92 rc tarballs due (and more)

Hello all,

We would like to inform you about the following:
* GNOME 3.15.92 rc tarballs due
* Hard Code Freeze

Tarballs are due on 2015-03-16 before 23:59 UTC for the GNOME 3.15.92
rc release, which will be delivered on Wednesday. Modules which were…

WordPress 4.2 Beta 1

WordPress 4.2 Beta 1 is now available! This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.2, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can […]

e.V. President Lydia Pintscher on the Role of a Nonprofit in Open Source Development

Linux.com interviews KDE e.V. president Lydia Pintscher. She talks about what KDE’s legal body does and why it is important for open source communities to have a charity to represent them. She also discusses the difference between company and commun…

Voting is Open for the 2015 At-Large Board Elections

Voting is now open for the 2015 At-Large Board positions for the Drupal Association! If you haven’t yet, check out the candidate profiles and review the Meet the Candidate sessions (we ran three) that we held. Get to know your candidates, and then get …

Development: GNOME 3.15.91 released!

Hi,

the second beta release of the GNOME 3.15 development cycle is finally here!

ISO’s of this release are avaialble here [1]. Thanks to Dominique
Leuenberger for this work

With this release we are officially now in “The String Freeze” [1] (that
sta…

KDE accepted to Google Summer of Code 2015

The KDE student programs team is happy to announce that KDE has been accepted as a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2015. This will allow students from around the world to work with mentors on KDE software projects. Successful students…

Wine 1.7.38 Released

The Wine development release 1.7.38 is now available.
What’s new in this release:

New version of the Gecko engine based on Firefox 36.
Support for themed scrollbars.
Updated version of the Mono e…

digiKam Sprint 2014

digiKam is a mature open-source project (more than 14 years old now) that provides a digital asset management application oriented to photography post-production.

The Event

It had been almost three years since the last time the digiKam team had an opportunity to meet, talk, code and spend some time together. Gilles Caulier, the lead coordinator, was a victim of a serious car crash two years ago and was thus unable to organize or attend such an event. Now, we finally had an opportunity to meet again. After a lot of effort finding a suitable place and a date suitable for all developers to work together under optimal conditions, the digiKam coding sprint 2014 finally took place in Berlin, between November 14th and 16th 2014.

Before going through what happened during these days, we give sincere thanks to Digia, the company in charge of Qt development, for hosting the event, and also in particular Tobias Hunger, who welcomed us at Digia’s offices located in the South of Berlin. Many thanks also to KDE e.V. for financial support that made the sprint possible.

People participating in the sprint (below, from left to right) :

What happened during the sprint

The next major task is to port digiKam to Qt5. Approximately 10% was already ported by Gilles before the sprint, and the objectives for this coding sprint were as follows:

  • Specify timeline for porting digiKam.
  • Identify priorities (what should be ported first).
  • Delegate porting tasks to developers (who does what?).

Long discussions evolved around these topics. Gilles explained the experience he already gained with this sort of work, which tools are available to facilitate the porting, and where manual work is required. The libraries which are part of the digikam project were prioritized for the port, and tasks were assigned.

There were also discussions about the KIPI framework and its plugins. After many years of development, some plugins are essentially unmaintained and no longer needed by digiKam as their functionality was superseded or moved, leaving them out of the porting task. We also talked about APIs to provide better integration between KIPI and digiKam for a task-based framework such as digiKam’s batch queue manager. The KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) port seems like the right time to integrate binary incompatible as well as architectural changes where needed.

Shourya Singh Gupta worked on implementing the KIPI tools functionality in the Batch Queue Manager (Tools Settings). To do this, there were discussions regarding what API changes must be done to the stack to facilitate a generic way to plug kipi-plugins into BQM. By the end of Coding Sprint, there were changes made to APIs to allow a generic way to plug kipi-plugins’ settings widgets into the user-interface, tested by converting two plugins (DNG converter and KIO export tool) to take advantage of this feature. Later, the background processing part of DNG converter—responsible for doing the real work—was also ported. This work is currently still in its separate feature branch, waiting to be merged after the frameworks porting branch becomes more stable.

Marcel worked on memory consumption problems with the database functionalities as well as several reported memory leaks. As soon as he could reproduce the problems under valgrind, many cleanups and fixes were committed. Among other fixes a long-standing bug (https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=205776) was fixed.

He also worked to complete the Removable Collection support. The goal is to show thumbnails from disconnected media without actually having access to the full file, as this information is stored by the digiKam in its internal metadata database. In practice this means that users can continue to search and preview collections with thumbnails and other metadata. Feedback to the user is provided to indicate items and collection that are not available for editing (See bugs https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=191494 and https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=114539). This feature was completed during the train ride back from Berlin, and committed Sunday evening following the Sprint.

Gilles polished the whole libkgeomap public API to be ready for the KF5 port. A lot of changes have been applied to reduce binary compatibility issues. This is especially needed if a library is to become a KF5 library to be more easily reused by other projects. A similar move has recently been made to libkface to make it available for KPhotoAlbum.

Veaceslav worked on porting libkdcraw from the old KDE4 Threadweaver API to the new KF5 Threadweaver implementation. Unfortunately, the new API was not quite stable nor documented, and Gilles decided to port it one more time to use a pure Qt thread pool implementation.

Teemu fixed some crashes as well as some small annoyances and introduced his plans to work on cleaning up the codebase, starting with cleaning up the CMakeLists and moving misplaced source files to their proper places. This will be an on-going process.

Dmitry, who is a long time digiKam user and who has written the famous Recipes Book, reported the need to have digiKam be less dependent of the KDE desktop so that it can be more suitable elsewhere. This does not mean losing KDE support, but rather wrapping properly all specific KDE features used by digiKam as optional when it’s possible. Dmitry took lots of photo of the event and shared user experience with developers, which introduced some long and instructive discussions about photographer methodologies and workflow.

After long days of coding, the tired developers went out in search for food in the quarter around the hotel at Rosenthaler Straße. Sushi on Friday and Vietnamese food on Saturday managed to sustain the developers for the following day of coding.

Aftermath

The digiKam release planhas been discussed and published. As many kipi-plugins are still not yet ported to Qt5, digiKam 5.0 must be delayed until the end of the year. Christmas sounds like the right moment to offer code to the user community.

MySQL support is disabled by default for now because it’s not fully functional and still experimental. MySQL support is still fully available, but as an optional feature. The plan is to find a student to work on it with the goal to stabilize code, and to add PostgreSQL support through Qt SQL plugins.

digiKam core (and the libraries it depends on) is now mostly ported to Qt5/KF5. It’s compilable and running, although there is still ongoing effort to port away from KDE4 support libraries that are currently used. The port is not yet ready for prime-time and one can encounter bugs caused by porting, but in the near future there will be beta releases to get reports from end-users about regressions.

However, there is still a lot of work required especially with kipi-plugins, of which only a small part (about 20%) is currently ported. For people who want to try out and help with development, the code is available in the Frameworks branches of corresponding projects. The contribution page has more information.

The build-system (CMake) structure is currently being cleaned up to make the codebase more maintainable for the future as well as making writing unit tests a breeze. At the same time, the dependencies of different parts are being investigated and cleaned up, to allow easier compilation on Windows and OSX.

Final Words

digiKam is planning to participate once again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) this year. There are some new ideas available in the wiki to attract new contributors. We suggest that anyone interested in working on digiKam this summer should start getting familiar with the project already.

Once more, thank you to the folks at Digia (and Tobias) for your hospitality and to KDE e.V. for sponsoring the event!

digiKam in action. More photos from the event are available on Flickr.

conf.kde.in 2015 – divine

Building on the success of conf.kde.in 2014 at Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Community Technology (DA-IICT) in the land of Gujarat, the horizon of the KDE Community is broadening and shifting south. conf.kde.in 2015 takes place on the…

Akademy 2015 Call for Papers and Registration open

Akademy is the KDE Community conference. If you are working on topics relevant to KDE or Qt, this is your chance to present your work and ideas at the Conference from 25th-31st July in A Coruña, Spain. The days for talks are Saturday and Sunday, 25th and 26th July. The rest of the week will be BoFs, unconference sessions and workshops.


Akademy 2014 attendees

What we are looking for

The goal of the conference section of Akademy is to learn and teach new skills and share our passion around what we’re doing in KDE with each other.

For the sharing of ideas, experiences and state of things, we will have short Fast Track sessions in a single-track section of Akademy. Teaching and sharing technical details is done through longer sessions in the multi-track section of Akademy.

If you think you have something important to present, please tell us about it. If you know of someone else who should present, please nominate them. For more details see the proposal guidelines and the Call for Papers.

The submission deadline is 31st March, 23:59:59 CEST.

Registration Open

Anyone can attend Akademy for free. But registration is required in order to attend the event. Please register soon so that we can plan accordingly.

About Akademy 2015, A Coruña, Spain

For most of the year, KDE—one of the largest free and open software communities in the world—works online by email, IRC, forums and mailing lists. Akademy provides all KDE contributors the opportunity to meet in person to foster social bonds, work on concrete technology issues, consider new ideas, and reinforce the innovative, dynamic culture of KDE. Akademy brings together artists, designers, developers, translators, users, writers, sponsors and many other types of KDE contributors to celebrate the achievements of the past year and help determine the direction for the next year. Hands-on sessions offer the opportunity for intense work bringing those plans to reality. The KDE Community welcomes companies building on KDE technology, and those who are looking for opportunities.

For more information, please contact The Akademy Team.

Dot Categories:

Provide feedback on the issue credit attribution user interface

With the help of a few key community members, we have been hard at work creating an interface for users to attribute their work in the issue queues to a customer or employer. (#2288727: [meta] Provide credit to organizations / customers who contribute to Drupal issues)

This is an important step in beginning to collect information about the contributions that organizations make in the Drupal ecosystem. Dries has talked about this need in detail in his blog post A method for giving credit to organizations that contribute code to Open Source. Since the original vision laid out in that post, which focused on commit credits, we have expanded the scope to include any contribution in the issue queues.

There will be three parts to the release of this feature on Drupal.org.

Comment Attribution

First, we needed a way that contributors could attribute their work to an organization—either their employer, their customer or both. (#2340363: Add issue comment attribution) We would like to have feedback through the comment on the issue. Here is an animated example of the comment attribution user interface:

Snazzy user interface for attributing a comment to an organization and/or a customer.

This new field on every issue comment lets the user attribute their work to organizations per comment. Our team is also very excited to introduce a new interface framework for inline editing of entity fields on Drupal.org. There are so many great ways we could use this for easier in place editing of metadata.

Once this comment attribution user interface is deployed, we’ll see how it is used, helping us build the next step.

Interface for Maintainers to Award Issue Credits

The next step will be a method for maintainers to award credit for the intended attribution. (#2369159: Extend crediting UI to include organizations & customers) Allowing maintainers to commit or award the credit for the issue accomplishes two important goals: we incentivise completion and we reduce gaming of the credit system.

By placing credits on issues—rather than commit mentions—we opened up the ability to recognize contributions outside of code. Patch reviews, comments on architectural decisions, wireframes and mockups, and general design feedback are all valuable contributions to the issue queues. Maintainers will now be able to reward those helpful behaviors.

Highlighting Organizations that Contribute

After a couple of months of collecting issue credit data, we will be able to begin using that data to highlight contributing organizations—giving them “trust currency” as Dries put it so well.

Issue credits are not the only contribution we will be tracking. We are already tracking how organizations give back financially through our supporting partner and membership programs. We track organizations that sponsor DrupalCons—and we’d like to start tracking how organizations help build camps.

Next Steps

If feedback goes well, our Drupal.org engineering team is planning to release the comment attribution feature on March 12th.

The user interface for maintainers to award credit should be available for comment in the coming week. Work on that issue has already started at #2369159: Extend crediting UI to include organizations & customers.

Let us know what you think!

Front page news: