Sony Gives Android Wear the Cold Shoulder

It’s been just barely a week since Google’s Android Wear project made its initial debut, but already one major maker of wearable devices has snubbed the new platform.
Sony this week said it will stick with its own Android-based SmartWatch platform for wearables instead. Consumer electronics manufacturers including Asus, HTC, LG, Motorola and Samsung have signed on as Android Wear partners.

Android Stomps Into Wearables Field

Google on Wednesday released a developer preview for Android Wear, a day after announcing the project, which Android head honcho Sunder Pichai teased at SXSW earlier this month.
The preview, which includes a software development kit, an Android emulator and a preview support library, is for development and testing only — not for production apps.

Ubuntu Touch Emulator: Installation And Usage In Ubuntu 14.04, 13.10 And 12.04

A while back, Canonical released an experimental Ubuntu Touch emulator running Unity 8 and Mir. Back then, there were a few bugs, including a nasty one on 64bit that could break the system, but they were fixed and although the emulator is still pretty slow, I though I’d write an article on how to properly […]

Evernote for Android Could Make the Pen Mighty Again

Evernote this week launched handwriting capabilities in its app for Android, offering a long-awaited extension of some of the functionality it brought to iOS when it acquired Penultimate back in 2012. “Sometimes there’s no better way to capture an idea than to write it down or sketch it out,” wrote Andrew Sinkov of Evernote’s marketing team in a Wednesday blog post.

App Converter Bridges Tizen-Android Divide

The first Tizen phones may still be on the horizon, but at least one software provider is already planning ahead. Infraware Technology debuted software that can port Android apps to the Tizen mobile OS without additional development or customization. Both Android and Tizen are based on Linux, of course, but that doesn’t mean their native apps are compatible.

Nokia Mixes It Up With New Android X Family

Nokia on Monday confirmed months of speculation with the unveiling of its X family of smartphones running Android. The X, X+ and XL are priced at $123, $136 and $150, respectively. Like Nokia’s low-end Asha line, the X devices come in bright colors. They borrow some of Asha’s other well-received features as well. Unlike Asha, however, the X series will not be available in the U.S.

Google’s Dirty Little Android Secrets Leaked

The Android operating system, which Google touts as open, isn’t. Google imposes strict restrictions on smartphone manufacturers and app developers in its Android mobile application distribution agreement, according to excerpts of documents revealed by Ben Edelman, an associate professor at the Harvard Business School. The information was obtained from two MADAs admitted in open court.

The Perils of Mobile App Insecurity

Smartphones and tablets have become ubiquitous — and so convenient that we often download apps and approve permissions without giving them much thought. Such behavior exposes the data we store on our prized devices to increasing risk. That blind trust is just what app makers count on. Android users, especially, are complacent about synchronizing apps on multiple devices.

How to Slim Down a Bloated Android Device

It’s a good idea to prune an Android device periodically, for a few reasons. A mishmash of apps, some aging, have all kinds of on-device routines running that can negatively affect performance. Worse, some are continually accessing the Internet and eating into your data cap — unlimited wireless Internet on mobile devices is practically nonexistent these days.

What’s Up With Tizen?

Consumers might soon have access to cheaper, more talented smartphones that could challenge the market dominance of Android and iOS. At least that is the promise from the Tizen Association. The growing group of phone makers and application developers recently launched a partner program with 36 companies from all segments of the mobile and connected device ecosystems.

How an Aging Sprint Device Can Reduce Your Android Phone Bill

In case you hadn’t noticed while wandering the aisles of your local consumer electronics big-box retailer, there is an explosion of mobile virtual network operators hitting the marketplace. MVNOs are telcos that buy capacity from major operators like T-Mobile or AT&T, for example, and sell it on to you. Walmart and América Móvil’s Straight Talk calling product is an example.

How to Set Up Email on a New Android Phone

Setting up a brand-new phone can involve numerous aggravations, but if you don’t rely on one of the majors like Yahoo and Gmail for email, one of the worst is surely the manual email server configuration. If you use a customized domain name, your Android device’s email client is likely to need this extra step. This could become an even more prevalent problem with the January U.S. launch of the Moto G smartphone.

How to Protect Your Android Device from Malware

If you’re in the majority of Android users, your smartphone or tablet isn’t protected from malware attacks. In fact, Jupiter Research reckons that a full 80 percent of smartphones are unprotected. Why is that a problem? The answer is that even if your smartphone hasn’t been affected so far, it likely will be, and that’s because of the vast sums of money motivating criminals.

How to Back Up Data on Your Android Smartphone

We all back up our PCs, right? Okay, well, we should back up our PCs, right? Well, smartphones and tablets have become so ubiquitous that we need to back them up now too. It’s time. Important photos, videos, contacts and music are now strewn across small, easy-to-lose, easy-to-break, highly pilferable devices. Fail to back up this stuff at your peril.

How to Tease the Best Photos Out of Your Android Phone

Recently I wrote about some of the best ways to take, keep and share photographs with an Android smartphone. We looked at some physical aspects, like how to hold the phone, and how to zoom. This week, we’re looking at some of the tweaks you can make to squeeze out the best shots. First, build an arsenal of apps. For an investment of a few dollars, you can up your game.

How to Take, Keep and Share Great Android Smartphone Photos

It’s not all photo apps and more apps when it comes to taking photographs with an Android smartphone — there are some basics that you need to know, unique to smartphones, that have nothing to do with imaging apps. If you’re finding that you’re migrating from a dedicated digital camera and taking more photographs with your phone but are disappointed with the results, here are some pointers.

No Gold Star for Galaxy Gear

The first reviews of the Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch have hit the Internet and they are generally tepid. However, "I’m not sure how anyone can give it a rating of anything until it is put through its paces over time by consumers actually using it in real-life situations," said Larry Chiagouris, a professor at Pace University. Many reviewers expressed concern over the Gear’s $300 price tag.

Google Adds Remote Locking for MIA Androids

Google on Tuesday rolled out a feature for its recently launched Android Device Manager that lets users lock down a stolen Android device from anywhere, via the Web.
"This is something that should be built into the OS and the platform because it’s an inherent security feature," said tech analyst Rob Enderle. Google is late to the game in rolling out its remote lock capability.

$7M Funding Means All Systems Go for Cyanogen

The Cyanogen free and open source Android firmware project on Wednesday announced that it had received $7 million in a Series A round of funding in April. The investment came from Benchmark Capital and Redpoint Ventures. "What will change is our capabilities, our speed, and our size," wrote Cyanogen founder Steve Kondik. "I am not going to let anyone stagnate."

Tiny CuBox-i Plays Nice With Linux and Android

Aiming to capture a piece of the market that has given the Raspberry Pi such a warm reception, SolidRun on Wednesday announced a new tiny computer of its own dubbed the "CuBox-i." Available in four models with prices starting at $45, the tiny computer includes an OpenGL|ES 2.0 GPU with OpenCL 1.1 embedded profile support; and up to four i.MX6 Cortex A9 ARM processors with as much as 1.2GHz each.